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Taking place in the heart of Washington, DC, DPLAfest 2016 (April 14-15) will bring together hundreds from DPLA’s large and growing community for interactive workshops, hackathons and other collaborative activities, engaging discussions with community leaders and practitioners, fun events, and more. DPLAfest 2016 will appeal to anyone interested in libraries, technology, ebooks, education, creative reuse of cultural materials, law, open access, and genealogy/family research.

Area institutions serving as co-hosts include the National Archives and Records Administration, the Library of Congress, and the Smithsonian Institution.

To view photographs, recordings, and social media from DPLAfest 2016, visit https://dp.la/info/get-involved/dplafest/april-2016/media/.
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Wednesday, April 13
 

1:30pm

DPLA Hands-on Cultural Heritage Hackathon

Links to notes, resources, and schedule: http://bit.ly/dplafest2016-hackathon

Have ideas for how you would mashup cultural heritage data, build new visualizations, find new ways to explore collections? Join us to get hands-on and creative with DPLA data, no matter what your technical expertise is. Not only will you learn about different ways to access and reuse DPLA data and content, but we’ll also be giving intros, tips, and tutorials for ways you can access and build with open data from the National Archives, Europeana, New York Public Library, and Historypin. If you have data skills or datasets you want to share, this will be a great place to do that as well, as we’ll be help each other to get small prototypes off the ground. The hackathon will continue on through the next two days at DPLAfest, and participants will have a chance to show off what they’ve built/played with/hacked together in short lightning sessions on Friday afternoon’s developer showcase.


Please note that registration for DPLAfest is required to attend this pre-fest portion of the hackathon.  


Speakers
avatar for Audrey Altman

Audrey Altman

Developer, Digital Public Library of America
Audrey Altman is a Developer for DPLA.  She works with the DPLA Technology Team to design, develop, test, integrate, support, and document user-facing applications and back-end systems; support content management policies, process, and workflows, and contribute to the development of new ones; and collaborate with stakeholders to contribute to strategic and tactical planning and implementation of content stewardship applications and... Read More →
SA

Shawn Averkamp

Manager, Metadata Services, NYPL Labs, New York Public Library
MB

Mark Breedlove

Senior Developer, Digital Public Library of America
JC

Jason Clingerman

Archives Specialist (Data Standards), National Archives and Records Administration
AI

Antoine Isaac

R&D Manager, Europeana
TJ

Tom Johnson

Metadata & Platform Architect, Digital Public Library of America
avatar for Mark Matienzo

Mark Matienzo

Director of Technology, Digital Public Library of America
Mark A. Matienzo is the Director of Technology for DPLA. As Director of Technology, Mark is responsible for the overall technology vision for the DPLA and overseeing its implementation. Mark also serves as the primary technical contact for outside organizations, partners, and developers. Prior to joining DPLA, Mark worked as an archivist and technologist specializing in born-digital materials and metadata management, at institutions including the... Read More →
avatar for Jon Voss

Jon Voss

Strategic Partnerships Director, Historypin
avatar for Scott Williams

Scott Williams

Developer, DPLA



Wednesday April 13, 2016 1:30pm - 5:00pm
Library of Congress (Madison Building): Mumford Room 101 Independence Avenue, SE Washington, DC 20540
 
Thursday, April 14
 

8:30am

Registration
Registration booth will be located in the Coolidge Auditorium lobby. Light breakfast and refreshments will be available.

Note: Attendees who will miss Thursday's registration period at the Library of Congress will be able to pick up their namebadge in the National Archives McGowan Theater Lobbies on Friday morning.

Thursday April 14, 2016 8:30am - 9:15am
Library of Congress (Jefferson Building): Coolidge Auditorium 10 First Street, SE Washington, DC 20540

9:15am

Welcome to DPLAfest 2016

DPLA Executive Director Dan Cohen, representatives from our host organizations, and major DPLA funders will welcome members of the public to DPLAfest 2016.

Video from this session is available at https://dp.la/info/get-involved/dplafest/april-2016/media/videos/.


Moderators
avatar for Dan Cohen

Dan Cohen

Executive Director, Digital Public Library of America
Dan Cohen is the Founding Executive Director of the DPLA, where he works to further the DPLA’s mission to make the cultural and scientific heritage of humanity available, free of charge, to all. Prior to his tenure, Dan was a Professor of History and the Director of the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media at George Mason University. At the Center, Dan oversaw projects ranging from new publishing ventures (PressForward) to online... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Willam D. Adams

Willam D. Adams

Chairman, National Endowment for the Humanities
William D. Adams is the tenth chairman of the National Endowment for the Humanities. Adams, president of Colby College in Waterville, Maine from 2000 until his retirement on June 30, 2014, is a committed advocate for liberal arts education and brings to the Endowment a long record of leadership in higher education and the humanities. | | A native of Birmingham, Michigan, and son of an auto industry executive, Adams earned his undergraduate... Read More →
avatar for David Ferriero

David Ferriero

Archivist of the United States, National Archives and Records Administration
David S. Ferriero was confirmed as 10th Archivist of the United States on November 6, 2009. Early in 2010 he committed the National Archives and Records Administration to the principles of Open Government—transparency, participation, and collaboration. To better position NARA to fulfill these goals, Mr. Ferriero initiated an agency transformation in 2010. The transformation restructured the organization and set goals to further our mission... Read More →
avatar for David Mao

David Mao

Acting Librarian of Congress, Library of Congress
David S. Mao became Acting Librarian of Congress Oct. 1, 2015, upon the retirement of James H. Billington. As Acting Librarian, Mao oversees the entire Library and its various service units to ensure the Library’s services to Congress and the American people are provided effectively. Mao previously served as Deputy Librarian of Congress, appointed January 12, 2015. During his time as Deputy, Mao oversaw a strategic re-alignment of Library... Read More →
GM

George Martinez

VP/CTO, Knight Foundation
MM

Maura Marx

Deputy Director of Library Services, IMLS
avatar for David Skorton

David Skorton

Secretary of the Smithsonian, Smithsonian
Dr. David J. Skorton is the 13th Secretary of the Smithsonian. He assumed his position July 1, 2015. | | As Secretary, Skorton oversees 19 museums and galleries, 20 libraries, the National Zoo and numerous research centers, including the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute and the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center. He is responsible for an annual budget of $1.3 billion, 6,500 employees and... Read More →
DW

Doron Weber

Sloan Foundation



Thursday April 14, 2016 9:15am - 10:15am
Library of Congress (Jefferson Building): Coolidge Auditorium 10 First Street, SE Washington, DC 20540

10:15am

Break
Thursday April 14, 2016 10:15am - 10:45am
TBA

10:45am

The Future of Libraries

It goes without saying that libraries have undergone significant change over the past fifteen years. What does their future hold? What new technologies, cultural trends, and other factors will shape their development? These topics and more are the subject of this fascinating conversation with library leaders and thinkers.


Moderators
avatar for Amy Garmer

Amy Garmer

Director, Aspen Institute Dialogue on Public Libraries
As Director of the Aspen Institute Dialogue on Public Libraries, Amy Garmer leads a multi-year initiative to explore, develop and champion new ways of thinking about U.S. public libraries. She is the author of the Dialogue’s 2014 vision report, Rising to the Challenge: Re-Envisioning Public Libraries. As Director of Journalism Projects for the Communications & Society Program, Amy has led a series of journalism initiatives over the... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Lee Rainie

Lee Rainie

Director of Internet, Science and Technology Research, Pew Research Center
Lee Rainie is the director of internet, science and technology research at Pew Research Center. Under his leadership, the Center has issued more than 500 reports based on its surveys that examine people’s online activities and the internet’s role in their lives. He also directs the Center’s new initiative on the intersection of science and society. The American Sociological Association gave Rainie its award for “excellence... Read More →
avatar for Richard Reyes-Gavilan

Richard Reyes-Gavilan

Executive Director, DC Public Library
Richard Reyes-Gavilan was appointed Executive Director of the District of Columbia Public Library in January 2014. He oversees a campus of 26 libraries, a staff of 600, and an annual operating budget of $57 million. In Fiscal Year 2015 over 4.2 million people visited public libraries in the District, a number that exceeds the combined home attendance of Washington D.C.’s professional baseball, hockey, and men’s basketball teams. He is... Read More →
avatar for Roberta Shaffer

Roberta Shaffer

Law Librarian of Congress, Library of Congress
Roberta I. Shaffer is a high-energy, innovative senior executive with proven success in envisioning, building and sustaining a broad portfolio of mission-critical responsibility within the government, academic, business, and non-profit sectors.  Shaffer became 24th Law Librarian of Congress in February 2016. She had served as acting Law Librarian of Congress from October.  She was appointed Associate Librarian for Library Services at... Read More →


Thursday April 14, 2016 10:45am - 11:30am
Library of Congress (Jefferson Building): Coolidge Auditorium 10 First Street, SE Washington, DC 20540

10:45am

ESDN Partners Present: A Look at New York’s DPLA Service Hub from the Ground Up

Empire State Digital Network (ESDN), the New York state service hub for DPLA, is administered by the Metropolitan New York Library Council (METRO) in partnership with eight regional library councils collectively working as the Empire State Library Network. Together, these partners collaborate to contribute digital resources from hundreds of New York collecting institutions to DPLA. Through these partnerships, ESDN is able to add material from all sorts of institutions including large research universities and tiny historical societies with all volunteer staffs.

ESDN was not an existing portal or repository before forming as a statewide service hub. Instead, the hub is built on a network of regionally based consortial partners to facilitate contribution to DPLA. Liaisons and digital collection administrators from the hub’s regional partners will participate on a panel to discuss the business of contributing to DPLA from their various contexts and platforms. Panelists will discuss their experience working with ESDN to coordinate contribution workflows, permissions, metadata guidelines, metadata mapping, and other outreach activities to member organizations through a distributed hub network.

Speakers
SD

Susan D’Entremont

Archivist & Digital Project Manager, Capital District Library Council
avatar for Laura Osterhout

Laura Osterhout

Member Services Librarian, Rochester Regional Library Council
I have an extensive background in digitization and continuing education for libraries.  I can talk about project management for digitization, working with vendors, scanning & imaging, metadata, and many other issues. I am also the IT administrator at our office and run our Google Apps products.
JP

Jennifer Palmentiero

Digital Services Librarian, Southeastern New York Library Resources Council
avatar for Kerri Willette

Kerri Willette

Deputy Director, Metropolitan NY Library Council (METRO)



Thursday April 14, 2016 10:45am - 11:30am
Library of Congress (Jefferson Building): LJ 119 10 First Street, SE Washington, DC 20540

10:45am

Reaching Educators, OR If You Build It, Will They Come?

Whether your digital project is still in the works or has been around for years, keeping and growing a target audience for your resources is a constant challenge. There are fundamental, nonintrusive steps you can take, however, that will not only help you gain a greater knowledge of your stakeholders but also assist you in shaping your content to reflect their needs.


Join the staff of EDSITEment, the National Endowment for the Humanities website for K-12 educators, and Franky Abbott, DPLA’s Curation and Education Strategist, in a conversation about how to create relevant content—and grow your base—with the aid of simple analytical tools and an unsparing eye for your project’s strengths and weaknesses. Examples of actual projects and a model challenge for the audience will illustrate various approaches to content and audience building.

Speakers
avatar for Franky Abbott

Franky Abbott

Franky Abbott works as the Curation and Education Strategist for the Digital Public Library of America. In this capacity, she leads DPLA education initiatives with teachers, and students in K-12 and higher education, organizes the Community Reps program, runs the Gates-funded Public Library Partnerships Project, and collaborates on digital exhibition curation. Franky came to DPLA on an American Council of Learned Societies Public Fellowship in... Read More →
SN

Shelley NiTuama

NEH/EDSITEment
avatar for Carol Peters

Carol Peters

Director, EDSITEment, NEH/EDSITEment
I direct NEH's EDSITEment, an award-winning website for K-12 teachers, students, librarians--and all those interested in the humanities. For over 18 years, EDSITEment has gained the trust of its stakeholders by being one of the few education sites that only features content reviewed by teachers and subject experts. We are proud to offer hundreds of free resources to educators and are always interested in making improvements on this special... Read More →
JP

Joseph Phelan

NEH/EDSITEment


Thursday April 14, 2016 10:45am - 11:30am
Library of Congress (Jefferson Building): Whittall Pavilion 10 First Street, SE Washington, DC 20540

10:45am

Geovisualization: Visualize that on a Map

Geovisualization is a set of tools and techniques which allow users to analyze geospatial data through the use of interactive visualization. While such visualization helps users uncover information and insights otherwise undiscoverable, geovisualization focuses on knowledge discovery by combining layers of information over geographic and locational components. It has great potential for libraries and museums to use in historic and genealogy research. Many libraries have documents and records that contain addresses or traces of geographic information, but lack the means of presenting that information in a visually usable form. This workshop will provide participants with hands-on experiences in extracting geographic information from text, creating GeoJSon files to represent the geographic features, and visualizing the information via Google Maps using Google Maps JavaScript API.


Speakers
avatar for Sarah Park

Sarah Park

Technology & Engineering Librarian, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville
Sarah Park is the Technology and Engineering Librarian at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville. Park manages and develops applications supporting the library’s digital services. Park received her M.S. in Library and Information Science at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and a second M.S. in Applied Computer Science at Northwest Missouri State University, where she worked as a Web Development and Reference Librarian for the... Read More →



Thursday April 14, 2016 10:45am - 12:15pm
Library of Congress (Madison Building): Pickford Theater 101 Independence Avenue, SE Washington, DC 20540

10:45am

Transcription Projects at the National Archives, Smithsonian, and Folger Shakespeare Library

Many of us want to create and sustain engaging projects to meet goals of our institutions but don't know where to start or struggle to control existing projects. Join leaders from the National Archives, Smithsonian Institution, and the Folger Shakespeare Library for a workshop to answer questions about how we use technology to engage our communities, specifically for transcription and tagging activities. We plan to share triumphs and failures to help others build similar programs. We will also discuss quality assurance for transcription, sustainability of engagement, and challenges from the public. In this session, participants will have the opportunity to see our platforms and learn about different projects at the three institutions. Participants will close the session with a hands-on exercise implementing the tactics we use to create a campaign around material in DPLA.


Speakers
MF

Meghan Ferriter

Smithsonian
avatar for Dina Herbert

Dina Herbert

Coordinator of the Innovation Hub, National Archives
SI

Suzanne Isaacs

National Archives
SP

Sarah Powell

Paleographer, Folger Shakespeare Library



Thursday April 14, 2016 10:45am - 12:15pm
Library of Congress (Jefferson Building): LJ 113 10 First Street, SE Washington, DC 20540

10:45am

DPLA Hands-on Cultural Heritage Hackathon

Links to notes, resources, and schedule: http://bit.ly/dplafest2016-hackathon

This hackathon session is intended for informal collaboration, with a very brief introductory information about the DPLA API and logistics related to the hackathon. For an in-depth introduction to DPLA's API, as well as those for other cultural heritage data sources, please join the hackathon session on Wednesday afternoon.


Speakers
avatar for Audrey Altman

Audrey Altman

Developer, Digital Public Library of America
Audrey Altman is a Developer for DPLA.  She works with the DPLA Technology Team to design, develop, test, integrate, support, and document user-facing applications and back-end systems; support content management policies, process, and workflows, and contribute to the development of new ones; and collaborate with stakeholders to contribute to strategic and tactical planning and implementation of content stewardship applications and... Read More →
MB

Mark Breedlove

Senior Developer, Digital Public Library of America
TJ

Tom Johnson

Metadata & Platform Architect, Digital Public Library of America
avatar for Scott Williams

Scott Williams

Developer, DPLA



Thursday April 14, 2016 10:45am - 5:00pm
Library of Congress (Madison Building): Dining Room A 101 Independence Avenue, SE Washington, DC 20540

11:30am

Break
Thursday April 14, 2016 11:30am - 11:45am
TBA

11:45am

Authorship in the Digital Age

Join us for a session dedicated to the state of writing in the digital age. What does it mean to write a book, digital or print or both? What new technologies and processes are re-defining the role of the author? Panelists will touch upon these questions and more during this exciting discussion between three prominent contemporary authors.


Moderators
avatar for Sarah Burnes

Sarah Burnes

Literary Agent, The Gernert Company
After stints in the editorial departments of Houghton Mifflin, the Knopf group, and Little, Brown, Sarah Burnes became an agent in 2001. Joining The Gernert Company in 2005, she now represents adult fiction writers (Alice McDermott and Tony Earley among them); children’s fiction writers (New York Times bestsellers Margaret Stohl and Pseudonymous Bosch); and journalists and critics (New York Times Magazine contributor Jon Gertner and... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Virginia Heffernan

Virginia Heffernan

Virginia Heffernan writes about digital culture chiefly for The New York Times, but also for The Wall Street Journal, WIRED, Mother Jones, and The New Yorker. Her essays on digitization are regularly anthologized. Her new book, "Magic and Loss: The Internet as Art," will be published in June by Simon & Schuster. She works as an editorial strategist for startups and VC firms. In 2002, she received her Ph.D. in English from... Read More →
avatar for Craig Mod

Craig Mod

Craig [http://craigmod.com] is a writer and designer who splits his time between Tokyo and New York. Previously a product designer at Flipboard, he is also a TechFellow award recipient and a 2011/2012 MacDowell writing fellow. He’s currently an advisor for Medium and Japan based SmartNews. He has written for The Atlantic, California Sunday Magazine, Aeon, Virginia Quarterly Review, New Scientist, Contents... Read More →
avatar for Robin Sloan

Robin Sloan

Robin Sloan grew up near Detroit and went to school at Michigan State, where he studied economics and co-founded a literary magazine called Oats. Between 2002 and 2012, he worked at Poynter, Current TV, and Twitter, and at all those places, his job had something to do with figuring out the future of media. | | Robin is the author of Mr. Penumbra’s 24-Hour Bookstore, which started as a short story and is now a full-length novel published by... Read More →


Thursday April 14, 2016 11:45am - 12:30pm
Library of Congress (Jefferson Building): Coolidge Auditorium 10 First Street, SE Washington, DC 20540

11:45am

Primary Sources and Open Educational Resources (OER): A Model for K-12 Librarians to Co-Lead STEM Inquiry

In this session, you’ll be introduced to an innovative and collaborative model used by librarian-teacher cohorts in a current IMLS project, School Librarians Advancing STEM Learning (2014-2017). Learn how librarians are working with science and mathematics teachers to build inquiry and literacy aligned to CCSS and NGSS standards in STEM classrooms through the integration of primary sources and open educational resources (OER). Using OER is a key vehicle for educators to create and remix relevant and shareable curriculum, across classrooms, districts, and states.


Session participants will be introduced to the collaborative instructional model used in School Librarians Advancing STEM Learning, a 3-year IMLS National Leadership Grant project, awarded to the Institute for the Study of Knowledge Management in Education (ISKME) (2014-2017). In this project, teacher and librarian teams (grades 6-12) are working together to build science literacy by co-designing OER units of inquiry that integrate primary sources, informational text, close reading, and the use of textual evidence into the science classroom. Librarians are learning to be essential partners in building science literacy as they support science teachers in the selection of appropriate resources and then guide student engagement with a carefully selected primary source set--including those in DPLA exhibits and collections. Extending upon this, librarians are also modeling instructional shifts in the Common Core State Standards by guiding student close reading, text- and source-based questioning, and development of evidence and claims through the analysis of sources. In addition to an overview of this model, session participants will explore exemplar OER units designed by project teacher-librarian teams that address CCSS science literacy, inquiry and rigor; be introduced to open education practices and project templates and tools; and, discuss leadership strategies for outreach and building similar collaborative partnerships with STEM teachers.

Speakers
avatar for Amee Evans Godwin

Amee Evans Godwin

Director, Strategic Initiatives, ISKME
avatar for Letha Kay Goger

Letha Kay Goger

Education & Library Consultant
I'm interested in realizing the potential of librarians -- school and public -- to advance STEM literacy and global literacy in their communities. STEM literacy + global literacy builds a multidisciplinary and multicultural perspective on the world. STEM literacy is expressed when groups of people have the knowledge, understandings, skills, dispositions, and behaviors to competently make decisions and act on local, regional, national and... Read More →



Thursday April 14, 2016 11:45am - 12:30pm
Library of Congress (Jefferson Building): Whittall Pavilion 10 First Street, SE Washington, DC 20540

11:45am

Wide Open Spaces: Bringing the Rest of the West into DPLA

DPLA Service Hubs in single states around the country have often worked with cultural heritage institutions physically located within 50 or 100 miles of the Hub. What happens when digitization and aggregation must be provided across the larger regions and states in the West? This session looks at issues that have emerged as collaboration is stretched across hundreds of miles, different cultures, and topographical impediments. Existing and potential new Service Hubs in the West are working towards responding to these challenges by discovering different models for collaboration -- in service provision, funding, and governance.


Join us as we hear about Service Hub developments in the West. Sandra McIntyre will talk about supporting libraries, archives, and museums in six states with digitization and aggregation services via the Mountain West Digital Library (MWDL), one of the initial Service Hubs in DPLA. She will describe the recent sustainability planning and governance re-structuring that MWDL has accomplished to accommodate the needs of a large region. Jodi Allison-Bunnell will describe work toward Service Hub formation in the Pacific Northwest, in the absence of the central (state or large institution) that is often the cornerstone of other Hubs. Adrian Turner will highlight a planning initiative underway in California, supported through LSTA funding administered by the California State Library, to formulate a blueprint for a potential Service Hub constituting a collaborative of multiple organizations. The panel will conclude with a discussion of ideas for completing the DPLA Service Hubs map in the West and bringing the rest of the West on board the national digital platform.

Speakers
avatar for Jodi Allison-Bunnell

Jodi Allison-Bunnell

Program Manager, Orbis Cascade Alliance
avatar for Sandra McIntyre

Sandra McIntyre

Director of Services and Operations, HathiTrust
Since May 2016 I have been the director of services and operations for HathiTrust at the University of Michigan office in Ann Arbor. HathiTrust is a partnership of over 120 academic and research institutions, offering a collection of millions of titles digitized from libraries around the world. Our TRAC-certified digital preservation repository provides long-term preservation and access services for public domain and in-copyright content from... Read More →
avatar for Adrian Turner

Adrian Turner

OAC/Calisphere Data Services Manager, California Digital Library



Thursday April 14, 2016 11:45am - 12:30pm
Library of Congress (Jefferson Building): LJ 119 10 First Street, SE Washington, DC 20540

12:00pm

Build your own tour of the Library of Congress Jefferson Building

Visit any of these stations around the Jefferson building where Library of Congress docents will share with DPLAfest participants stories and background information about the architectural details and exhibits on display.

  • Great Hall
  • Bibles Gallery (Gutenberg and Mainz bibles, Evolution of the Written word mural)
  • Minerva Mosaic and Blashfield Evolution of Civilization poster
  • Riis Exhibition
  • Exploring the Early America Exhibition

DPLAfest participants are also welcome to visit any of the current exhibits during regular hours of operations  8:30am – 5:00pm. More information about current exhibits: https://www.loc.gov/exhibits/current/

Thursday April 14, 2016 12:00pm - 2:00pm
TBA

12:30pm

Lunch
An assortment of boxed lunches will be available from the Great Hall (Jefferson Building) and the Madison Hall (Madison Building).

1:45pm

Technology Trends in Libraries

Join us for a conversational discussion with technologists from both inside and outside of the library industry. Panelists will discuss all aspects of technology, including hardware and software, that are likely to impact libraries and similar industries. There will also be time allocated for questions from, and discussion with, the audience.


Moderators
avatar for Jamie Hollier

Jamie Hollier

President, Anneal, Inc.
Jamie Hollier is a project manager and consultant who is passionate about technology and the ways it can be used to create stronger communities. Jamie is the owner of Anneal, a library consulting firm, and a partner at Commerce Kitchen, a web design, development, and marketing company. One of her current consulting roles is providing project management for DigitalLearn.org, a Public Library Association (PLA) Initiative funded by the Institute... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Carson Block

Carson Block

Technology Consultant
Carson Block has led, managed, and supported library technology efforts for more than 20 years. His efforts at his first library position at the Loveland, Colorado Public Library (beginning in 1994) resulted in the first broadband Internet connection and public access computers for the library. The line was also the first major Internet connection for the city government complex of Loveland! |   | Carson brings a user-centered... Read More →
avatar for Alison Macrina

Alison Macrina

Library Freedom Project
Alison Macrina is a librarian, privacy activist, and the founder and director of the Library Freedom Project, an initiative which aims to make real the promise of intellectual freedom in libraries by teaching librarians and their local communities about surveillance threats, privacy rights and law, and privacy-protecting technology tools to help safeguard digital freedoms. Alison is passionate about connecting surveillance issues to larger... Read More →
avatar for John Resig

John Resig

Staff Engineer, Khan Academy
John Resig is a staff engineer at Khan Academy and the creator of the jQuery JavaScript library. He’s also the author of the books Pro JavaScript Techniquesand Secrets of the JavaScript Ninja. John has developed a comprehensive Japanese woodblock print database and image search engine:Ukiyo-e.org. He’s a board member of the Japanese Art Society of America and is a Visiting Researcher... Read More →


Thursday April 14, 2016 1:45pm - 2:30pm
Library of Congress (Jefferson Building): Coolidge Auditorium 10 First Street, SE Washington, DC 20540

1:45pm

Ebook Research and Advocacy

This panel will give an update on exciting research and advocacy efforts happening in the area of ebooks: ReadersFirst, Charlotte Initiative, and Open eBooks.

Readers First is an international organization of nearly 300 libraries representing 200 million readers dedicated to ensuring that library users have the same open, easy and free access to e-books that they have come to rely on with physical books. Towards the end of achieving a better ebook experience, Reader’s First advocates for the following: search and browse a single comprehensive catalog with all of a library’s offerings at once;  the ability to place holds, check-out items, view availability, manage fines and receive communications within individual library catalogs or in the venue the library believes will serve them best; Download e-books that are compatible with ALL readers.

The Charlotte Initiative is  a Mellon funded two-year research and planning grant, based at UNC Charlotte,  that will produce recommendations for the licensing and acquisition of electronic resources, particularly eBooks.  Working groups will be convened to discuss, define, and investigate the impact on institutions of three principles for eBook licenses: unlimited simultaneous users, No Digital Rights Management (DRM) either contractual or technical, irrevocable perpetual access and archival rights.

Open eBooks is a new initiative and e­reader app that will make thousands of popular, top­selling eBooks available to children in need for free, is launching today. The initiative is designed to address the challenge of providing digital reading materials to children living in low ­income households. A coalition of literacy, library, publishing and technology partners joined together to make the Open eBooks program possible. The initiative’s partners ­­ Digital Public Library of America (DPLA), First Book, and The New York Public Library (NYPL), with content support from digital books distributor Baker & Taylor ­­ created the app, curated the eBook collection, and developed a system for distribution and use. They received financial support from the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS)  and the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation and content contributions from major publishers.


Moderators
avatar for Rachel Frick

Rachel Frick

Business Development Director, Digital Public Library of America
Rachel Frick is the Director of Business Development. In this position, she is responsible for building out DPLA’s sustainability plan and forging extensive new relationships in order to build DPLA’s visibility, impact, and financial resources. She comes to DPLA, having served as the director of the Digital Library Federation program at the Council on Library and Information Resources for the past four years. In her capacity as DLF... Read More →

Speakers
MB

Michael Blackwell

Director, St. Mary’s County Library
AB

Alison Bradley

Head of Research and Information Services J. Murrey Atkins Library, UNC - Charlotte
CR

Colin Rogister

Special Advisor, National Economic Council, The White House



Thursday April 14, 2016 1:45pm - 2:30pm
Library of Congress (Jefferson Building): LJ 119 10 First Street, SE Washington, DC 20540

1:45pm

Funding DPLA: Reflections and New Opportunities

Over the past five years, a diverse array of government agencies and private foundations has awarded grant funding to the Digital Public Library of America. Despite differing missions, these organizations have recognized DPLA’s potential with support for planning, human resources, hub development, and special initiatives tackling issues such as education and rights statements. During this session, a small group of DPLA funders will discuss how this landmark project responds to their respective missions and priorities. Session attendees will learn more about grant-funded projects undertaken by DPLA and partners, as well as funding opportunities for future work that may leverage or enhance DPLA. A Q&A will follow brief presentations from each funder.


Speakers
PC

Perry Collins

National Endowment for the Humanities
TO

Trevor Owens

Institute of Museum and Library Services
DR

Daniel Reid

Whiting Foundation
DW

Doron Weber

Sloan Foundation
JW

Joel Wurl

National Endowment for the Humanities


Thursday April 14, 2016 1:45pm - 2:30pm
Library of Congress (Madison Building): Montpelier Room 101 Independence Avenue, SE Washington, DC 20540

1:45pm

Hydra in a Box: Building A Next-Generation Platform for Digital Collections

DPLA, Stanford University and DuraSpace are partnering to extend the existing Hydra project codebase and its vibrant and growing community to build, bundle, and promote a feature-rich, robust, flexible platform for digital collections. The project's components including development of best of breed repository platform, a hosted service for the repository, and a suite of metadata aggregation tools designed to support institutions like DPLA's Hubs. This presentation will provide an overview of the project and insight into its design phase, including what we've learned through the process of gathering requirements through surveys, individual interviews, and focus groups.


Speakers
avatar for Hannah Frost

Hannah Frost

Digital Library Services Manager, Stanford Libraries
Stanford University Libraries
avatar for Gretchen Gueguen

Gretchen Gueguen

Data Services Coordinator, Digital Public Library of America
Gretchen Gueguen is a Data Services Coordinator, working alongside our Director and Assistant Director for Content to bring on new partners, conduct data mapping and ingest, perform quality assurance, and support several other critical projects. Prior to DPLA, Gretchen worked as Digital Archivist at the University of Virginia where she helped establish the first born-digital archives program. Gretchen has also worked at East Carolina University... Read More →
avatar for Mark Matienzo

Mark Matienzo

Director of Technology, Digital Public Library of America
Mark A. Matienzo is the Director of Technology for DPLA. As Director of Technology, Mark is responsible for the overall technology vision for the DPLA and overseeing its implementation. Mark also serves as the primary technical contact for outside organizations, partners, and developers. Prior to joining DPLA, Mark worked as an archivist and technologist specializing in born-digital materials and metadata management, at institutions including the... Read More →



Thursday April 14, 2016 1:45pm - 2:30pm
Library of Congress (Madison Building): Pickford Theater 101 Independence Avenue, SE Washington, DC 20540

1:45pm

Inside the black box: Influencing public policy to advance DPLA interests

DPLAfest is in Washington, D.C. this year, with a new presidential Administration coming to town in less than a year, and a broad array of our information policy issues on the table. How can the DPLA community have an impact on our priority issues of concern such as copyright, funding for libraries and allied fields, digital preservation, and key DPLA application domains such as education and research? Come join two senior staffers of the American Library Association’s Office for Information Technology Policy (OITP) to develop your understanding and ask questions.

This session includes the nuts and bolts of policy: What really happens inside the black box of D.C. political machinery? The transition to a new Administration will be used as the framework for explication, concluding with plans and thoughts for the months ahead. What should be done?


Speakers
LC

Larra Clark

Deputy Director, American Library Association
AS

Alan S. Inouye

Director, American Library Association



Thursday April 14, 2016 1:45pm - 2:30pm
Library of Congress (Jefferson Building): Whittall Pavilion 10 First Street, SE Washington, DC 20540

1:45pm

The GIF Element: Making, Finding, & Using GIFs to Great Effect

In this workshop, we'll be exploring the GIF in its natural habitat: the internet. But first, some background: What are GIFs? How did they develop? How do you say “GIF”? In this workshop, we’ll explore how to use GIFs, when they’re most successful, the challenges associated with using them, and how to make, find, and use them yourself. We’ll talk about the ins and outs of some content sources, including resources in the DPLA, and review a few apps and programs you can use to make and share them yourself. And then, with some audience input, we’ll be demonstrating how to make a GIF using open source images to tell a joke, punctuate a thought, or convey an emotion. A picture is worth a thousand words? Well, a GIF is worth a million.


Participants will leave with a deeper understanding of the best technology to use to create GIFs and the social circumstances in which they’re most effective. They’ll be empowered to experiment with GIFs on their own, whether that means using a tool like NYPL’s Stereogranimator or going all out with Photoshop. And they’ll receive a worksheet summarizing some key takeaways and resources to use in their adventures.


Proposed Schedule:

10 minutes - What are GIFs?

15 minutes - How do GIFs work on social media?

10 minutes - Where can you find content for GIFs?

35 minutes - Let’s make a GIF! With audience input!

10 minutes - Let’s brainstorm some other GIFs!

15 minutes - Audience Q&A

Speakers
avatar for Shaelyn Amaio

Shaelyn Amaio

Consultant, Lord Cultural Resources
avatar for Darren Cole

Darren Cole

Digital Engagement Specialist, National Archives
I'm a Digital Engagement Specialist with the Office of Innovation at the National Archives. I work on a variety of web and social media projects, including Today's Document (todaysdocument.tumblr.com), Archives.gov, and our new pilot crowdsourced history platform, HistoryHub.archives.gov .
RN

Richard Naples

Smithsonian Libraries
avatar for Derek Tulowitzky

Derek Tulowitzky

Web, Social Media, and Outreach Manager, Muncie Public Library



Thursday April 14, 2016 1:45pm - 3:15pm
Library of Congress (Jefferson Building): LJ 113 10 First Street, SE Washington, DC 20540

2:30pm

Break
Thursday April 14, 2016 2:30pm - 3:00pm
TBA

3:00pm

Hubs Showcase #1
This session will feature a handful of short 12-minute presentations about interesting projects and updates from members of the DPLA Hubs Network. Presentations include:

Umbra: Building a Subject-based Portal for Searching African American History

The urgency of representing African American history and culture as fully as possible drives Umbra: Search African American History (umbrasearch.org), a freely available search tool that brings together the most extensive digital collection dedicated to African American history and culture from US archives, museums, and cultural heritage institutions. As a discovery platform and call to action, Umbra enables the creation of new works—curricula, scholarship, art of all kinds—that illuminate parts of our history that have not been broadly accessible. Through partnerships, open data, and technology, Umbra is working against centuries of loss and erasure to expand the historical record for students, scholars, and the general public. Currently, over 400,000 digital items are made available from over 500 institutions, many of these drawn from the DPLA’s own aggregated collections using the Open API Codex. This presentation explores the process of pulling together disparate digital resources, including but not limited to DPLA; the processes and challenges of identifying and delivering relevant content; the technologies employed; and the relationships built along that way that make this work possible. Attendees should expect to learn about our own work in building and sustaining this important subject-based portal and to feel inspired to explore other opportunities to build subject-based pathways to discovery.


A Peek in the Portal: The University of North Texas The Portal to Texas History

This presentation with offer a brief look into the digital collections added to The University of North Texas’ The Portal to Texas History in the last year. Examples include projects completed through our Rescuing Texas History Mini-Grant program for 2014, The Barbara Jordan Archives Collection, and the Texas Historical Commission’s Historic Building Negatives Collection among others.

3D Scanning for Small Budgets: How Local Libraries and Museums will Play a Role in Creating a 3D Digital Library

Indiana University–Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI) University Library has been digitizing and providing access to community and cultural heritage collections since 2006. Varying formats include: audio, video, photographs, slides, negatives, and text (bound, loose). The library provides access to these collections using CONTENTdm. As 3D technologies become increasingly popular in libraries and museums, IUPUI University Library is exploring the workflows and processes as they relate to 3D artifacts. This presentation will demonstrate Creaform’s Go!Scan 3D scanner while discussing collection digitization for small museums. Presenter will share insight on: key terms and features, access of 3D objects in a CONTENTdm collection, and share costs of 3D scanning.


Speakers
avatar for Jenny Johnson

Jenny Johnson

Digital Scholarship Outreach Librarian, IUPUI University Library
JM

Jake Mangum

Project Development Librarian, University of North Texas Libraries
MM

Marcia McIntosh

Digital Production Librarian, University of North Texas
University of North Texas
JR

Jason Roy

Director, Digital Library Services, University of Minnesota
University of Minnesota



Thursday April 14, 2016 3:00pm - 3:45pm
Library of Congress (Madison Building): Pickford Theater 101 Independence Avenue, SE Washington, DC 20540

3:00pm

Library eBook Platforms: An Update

Library ebook stakeholders convened at DPLAfest 2015 to collaborate and address the challenges ebooks present to libraries. What does the library ebook ecosystem look like one year later? What progress have we made, and where can we continue to disrupt? During this session, we will discuss the goals and states of both library-owned platforms and consortial solutions, innovative technologies, and the possibility of a "national ebook platform."


Moderators
avatar for Michelle Bickert

Michelle Bickert

Ebook Program Manager, Digital Public Library of America
Michelle Bickert is the Ebook Program Manager at DPLA. She works with the Business Development Director to develop DPLA’s ebook strategy and serves as the primary point person for service development and community engagement. Prior to DPLA Michelle was the Digital Content Coordinator for the Arizona State Library, Archives and Public Records, where she helped launch the statewide ebook platform Reading Arizona and managed the Arizona Memory... Read More →

Speakers
MM

Micah May

Director of Business Development, The New York Public Library
avatar for Christine Peterson

Christine Peterson

Amigos eShelf℠ Service Manager, Amigos Library Services
I am the manager of our Amigos eShelf service, an ebook platform for libraries that strives to provide more options when it comes to working with ebooks.
GP

Gregory Pronevitz

Executive Director, Massachusetts Library System



Thursday April 14, 2016 3:00pm - 3:45pm
Library of Congress (Jefferson Building): Coolidge Auditorium 10 First Street, SE Washington, DC 20540

3:00pm

Do we need to worry? : Update on copyright matters affecting digital libraries

Washington, DC is abuzz with studies, hearings, legislation, judiciary rulings—all on digital copyright. Orphan works, proposals for extended collective licensing (ECL), stronger application of notice and takedown schemes, and continued focus on mass digitization remain probable options that may be considered by Congress which will affect preservation of the cultural record, innovation, research endeavors, and new forms of creativity. How can we ensure that DPLA and other digital libraries can continue to flourish when content filtering and heightened anti-piracy schemes seem to be of most interest to Congress? What solutions are good for society, and what proposals must we fight against?

Two copyright policy experts will discuss the conversations happening in Congress and in federal agencies as well as judiciary rulings related to fair use, gate-keeping, digital preservation and access to works. They will examine what tools currently exist to address digital concerns and how they can be effectively utilized.

Speakers
KC

Krista Cox

Association of Research Libraries (ARL)
CR

Carrie Russell

Director, Program on Public Access to Info, American Library Association



Thursday April 14, 2016 3:00pm - 3:45pm
Library of Congress (Jefferson Building): Whittall Pavilion 10 First Street, SE Washington, DC 20540

3:00pm

British Library – Clusters in a digital age

The Living Knowledge Network and the Knowledge Quarter are two unique clusters that are supporting the digital research network nationally in the UK and in London.  Head of Strategy Liz White will explore how these clusters are helping to open up the British Library as an organisation informing our knowledge sharing capabilities.


Speakers
avatar for Liz White

Liz White

Head of Strategy Development, British Library
Liz White is a public sector strategist, with 15 years of experience at national level. Her role at the British Library combines her skills in public policy and strategy development with her passion for encouraging reading and access to knowledge. Prior to joining the BL, Liz spent more than a decade in the UK Civil Service.



Thursday April 14, 2016 3:00pm - 3:45pm
Library of Congress (Madison Building): Montpelier Room 101 Independence Avenue, SE Washington, DC 20540

3:00pm

Digital Collections in the K–12 Classroom: Connecting with Teachers and Students

What are teachers and students looking for from digital collections and platforms? In this session, education project leaders from the National Archives, the Smithsonian, and the Digital Public Library of America will, through the lens of their individual projects, lead a discussion on the big questions of digital GLAM education outreach:


1. What is the value of education work for cultural institutions?

2. What is the value of this content to teachers and students? How do they use it?

3. What are the most important considerations when designing for this audience?

4. What does it mean to put control in teachers’ hands? What are the advantages?

5. What are some useful first steps for connecting education audiences with digital collections?

Speakers
avatar for Franky Abbott

Franky Abbott

Franky Abbott works as the Curation and Education Strategist for the Digital Public Library of America. In this capacity, she leads DPLA education initiatives with teachers, and students in K-12 and higher education, organizes the Community Reps program, runs the Gates-funded Public Library Partnerships Project, and collaborates on digital exhibition curation. Franky came to DPLA on an American Council of Learned Societies Public Fellowship in... Read More →
avatar for Brian Ausland

Brian Ausland

Director of Education, Navigation North
Brian works as a primary consultant to the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access in conducting both the research and development of the new Smithsonian Learning Lab. He also works as a specialist with the US Dept. of Ed. Tech and led the development of the California CTE/STEM Online Community of Practice and California's My Digital Chalkboard K-12 platform.
SG

Stephanie Greenhut

National Archives
DM

Darren Milligan

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access



Thursday April 14, 2016 3:00pm - 3:45pm
Library of Congress (Jefferson Building): LJ 119 10 First Street, SE Washington, DC 20540

3:45pm

Break
Thursday April 14, 2016 3:45pm - 4:15pm
TBA

4:15pm

Hubs Showcase #2
This session will feature a handful of short presentations about interesting projects and updates from members of the DPLA Hubs Network. Presentations include:

Don't fear the reaper: metadata harvesting, lessons learned, and looking ahead with Calisphere

Since 2014, the California Digital Library (CDL) has been piloting the use of a metadata harvesting infrastructure to aggregate unique collections from across the 10-campus University of California library system -- and libraries, archives, and museums throughout the state. These collections are now available through the newly redesigned Calisphere (http://calisphere.cdlib.org/) website in addition to the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA). Our relatively new metadata harvesting infrastructure, which adapts DPLA's early code base, has made it easier for contributors to share collections. We're now able to aggregate a much larger range of resources than before: 400,000 objects are now available in Calisphere -- an immediate 70% increase in content from the previous site. However, there are challenges to scaling and streamlining our processes, from the point of staging collections for harvest, through to quality control checking results. This talk will highlight where we've been with metadata aggregation, and where we're planning to go. We'll discuss points of pain and lessons learned with the existing infrastructure. We'll report on an environmental scan we conducted to evaluate DPLA's Heiðrún stack, along with approaches developed by DigitalNZ and other large-scale aggregators. Last, we will discuss new requirements that we've developed, and directions that we are planning to take to improve on and ramp up our processes.

Creating shareable metadata in New York State and Beyond: The ESDN Metadata Working Group

Empire State Digital Network (ESDN), the New York state service hub for DPLA, is administered by the Metropolitan New York Library Council (METRO) in partnership with eight other regional library councils collectively working as the Empire State Library Network. Together, these partners work to contribute digital resources from hundreds of New York institutions to DPLA. In order to improve discoverability of these resources in DPLA and other aggregated platforms, ESDN has convened a group of metadata professionals from throughout New York State. The aim of the group is to 1.) create documentation and best practices to help our partners create richer, more shareable metadata and 2.) host community events focusing on metadata cleanup and enrichment, and to document those events so that they can be easily replicated around New York State and the wider community. In this lightning talk, we will plan to provide an overview of group, our goals and objectives as well as the work we’ve completed so far and are planning for the rest of 2016.

Service Hub Strategies: Enabling collection building through consultation

The Recollection Wisconsin Service Hub is one of the newest hubs to join the DPLA network. One of our primary goals as a service hub is to grow the collections and diversity of contributing institutions from Wisconsin, and to do that on a relative shoestring. To that end, we have established a service approach that emphasizes training and consulting over digitization services. This lightning session will outline the consultation model in development by University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Libraries, in partnership with Marquette University Library, and provide specific examples based on two pilot projects with a local historical society and medical college. We hope to expand the model to better position Wisconsin cultural heritage institutions, regardless of size or infrastructure, to make the riches of their collections accessible to a broad audience through DPLA.


Speakers
avatar for Ann Hanlon

Ann Hanlon

Head, Digital Collections and Initiatives, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Libraries
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
avatar for Barbara Hui

Barbara Hui

Software Developer, California Digital Library
avatar for Emily Pfotenhauer

Emily Pfotenhauer

Recollection Wisconsin Program Manager, WiLS
MR

Mark Redar

Software Developer, California Digital Library
avatar for Chris Stanton

Chris Stanton

Metadata Specialist, Metropolitan New York Library Council
avatar for Brian Tingle

Brian Tingle

Technical Lead, California Digital Library
wandered into the library 20 years ago and never left



Thursday April 14, 2016 4:15pm - 5:00pm
Library of Congress (Madison Building): Pickford Theater 101 Independence Avenue, SE Washington, DC 20540

4:15pm

Smithsonian, Library of Congress, and National Archives: Opportunities and Challenges for Working Together

With the 100th anniversary of the US entry in WWI next year, SI, LOC, and NARA are working together on a project to bring new WWI content to museums, teachers, and coders. The collaboration and content on this project are unique. Come learn about the WWI project, the collaboration, and the barriers that can slow organizations from working together.


Moderators
avatar for Jon Voss

Jon Voss

Strategic Partnerships Director, Historypin

Speakers
DM

David McOwen

New Media Developer, Smithsonian Institution National Museum of American History
PW

Pamela Wright

Chief Digital Access Strategist, National Archives at College Park
HZ

Helena Zinkham

Library of Congress



Thursday April 14, 2016 4:15pm - 5:00pm
Library of Congress (Jefferson Building): Coolidge Auditorium 10 First Street, SE Washington, DC 20540

4:15pm

Free for All: The Story of NYPL’s Public Domain Drop

On January 6, 2016, NYPL announced that out-of-copyright materials in NYPL Digital Collections are now available as high-resolution downloads. No permission required; no restrictions on use.


The release of more than 180,000 digitized items represents both a simplification and an enhancement of digital access to a trove of unique and rare materials: a removal of administration fees and processes from public domain content, and also improvements to interfaces — popular and technical — to the digital assets themselves. Online users of the NYPL Digital Collections website now find more prominent download links and filters highlighting restriction-free content; while more technically inclined users now benefit from updates to the Digital Collections API enabling bulk use and analysis, as well as data exports and utilities posted to NYPL's GitHub account. These changes are intended to facilitate sharing, research and reuse by scholars, artists, educators, technologists, publishers, and Internet users of all kinds.


To encourage novel uses of our digital resources, we also launched a call for applications for a new Remix Residency program, intended for digital creators to make transformative and creative uses of digital collections and data. To provide further inspiration for reuse, Labs also released several demonstration projects delving into specific collections, as well as a visual browsing tool allowing users to explore the public domain collections at scale. Taken together, these projects suggest just a few of the myriad investigations made possible by fully opening these collections. At this presentation, we’ll share the story of how we produced this release, including strategic, tactical, and impact design decisions -- and, most importantly, and how it’s been received so far.


Speakers
avatar for Greg Cram

Greg Cram

Associate Director, Copyright and Information Policy, The New York Public Library
The New York Public Library
avatar for Josh Hadro

Josh Hadro

Deputy Director, NYPL Labs, The New York Public Library
avatar for Shana Kimball

Shana Kimball

Manager, Public Programs & Outreach, The New York Public Library



Thursday April 14, 2016 4:15pm - 5:00pm
Library of Congress (Jefferson Building): LJ 119 10 First Street, SE Washington, DC 20540

4:15pm

Moving Ebooks out of Silos

Book digitization projects have existed for decades. As technology evolved, ebooks were created for various platforms and in myriad formats, forcing ebooks to live in silos based on how they could be accessed. In this panel, participants will discuss how they are working to break ebooks out of these silos. Panelists will begin by talking about the technology and projects that are making ebooks easier to access, especially on mobile devices. The panel will shift into a discussion about how DPLA hubs can work within their regional networks to unlock ebook content and make it openly accessible.


Moderators
avatar for Michelle Bickert

Michelle Bickert

Ebook Program Manager, Digital Public Library of America
Michelle Bickert is the Ebook Program Manager at DPLA. She works with the Business Development Director to develop DPLA’s ebook strategy and serves as the primary point person for service development and community engagement. Prior to DPLA Michelle was the Digital Content Coordinator for the Arizona State Library, Archives and Public Records, where she helped launch the statewide ebook platform Reading Arizona and managed the Arizona Memory... Read More →

Speakers
EH

Eric Hellman

Founder, Unglue.it
RS

Ron Snyder

Technical Lead, JSTOR Labs
avatar for Rebecca Welzenbach

Rebecca Welzenbach

Director of Strategic Integration and Partnerships, Michigan Publishing
University of Michigan



Thursday April 14, 2016 4:15pm - 5:00pm
Library of Congress (Jefferson Building): Whittall Pavilion 10 First Street, SE Washington, DC 20540

4:15pm

Pond to Lake to Ocean: Partnerships for Moving Cultural Heritage Materials into the DPLA

In 2015, the Knight Foundation funded the Culture in Transit project, a collaboration between the Metropolitan New York Library Council (METRO), Brooklyn Public Library (BPL) and Queens Public Library (QL) to bring mobile scanning equipment to smaller libraries, archives, museums, and the communities they serve. The project offers community members and smaller cultural institutions an opportunity to obtain digital copies of their materials using state-of-the-art equipment. Through community scanning events at branch libraries, Culture in Transit empowers NYC residents to take an active role in chronicling their local cultural heritage. Digitized materials are in turn added to the Queens and Brooklyn’s collections and made available via their online catalogs. At the same time, through METRO’s work with small cultural heritage institutions, hidden institutional collections are digitized and shared with the public through METRO’s online portal. All materials contributed as part of this project are being harvested by the Empire State Digital Network and will be included in the Digital Public Library of America. Our outreach-centered digitization model aims to democratize and diversify NYC’s historical record.


Project lead, Anne Karle-Zenith (METRO) and Queens Library lead, Natalie Milbrodt, will share some of the strategic and logistical thinking that has gone into the Culture in Transit program so far, and discuss the nature of the collaboration across its three partner institutions. They will share lessons learned by the Libraries about the real needs of private individuals in making the leap from a snapshot in a photo album to a record in the DPLA, as well as METRO’s efforts in identifying institutions that have appropriate collections who are also ready to work within the parameters of our on-site digitization model. This talk will be helpful for those interested in outreach and wondering how to establish partnerships between larger institutions capable of sharing digitization and metadata creation resources and smaller organizations in need of that help.


Speakers
AK

Anne Karle-Zenith

Digital Services Manager, METRO New York Library Council
avatar for Natalie Milbrodt

Natalie Milbrodt

Associate Coordinator, Metadata Services, Queens Library



Thursday April 14, 2016 4:15pm - 5:00pm
Library of Congress (Jefferson Building): LJ 113 10 First Street, SE Washington, DC 20540

6:30pm

Reception
Join us for an evening reception at the National Archives! There will be passed hors d'oeuvres, drinks, and special events including trivia, tours, and a Recovering the Classics pop-gallery (details below). Please be sure to bring your DPLAfest namebadge for admittance!

About the Recovering the Classics pop-up gallery
Immerse yourself in the pop-up gallery for Recovering the Classics, a crowdsourced campaign which invites artists around the world to imagine covers for great books in the public domain. The exhibit is part of the 50x50 campaign which aims to get at least 50 designs exhibited in all 50 states (More at 50x50.us). 

Thursday April 14, 2016 6:30pm - 8:30pm
National Archives and Records Administration: Rotunda Galleries Constitution Avenue between 7th and 9th Streets, NW, Washington, DC
 
Friday, April 15
 

8:30am

Breakfast
Continental breakfast will be available at the Smithsonian Ripley Center and the National Archives. 

Note: Attendees who missed Thursday's registration period at the Library of Congress will be able to pick up their namebadge in the National Archives McGowan Theater Lobbies.

Friday April 15, 2016 8:30am - 9:30am
TBA

9:30am

Digital Collection Showcase #1
Learn about interesting digital collections and projects in this session featuring a handful of 12-minute presentations. Presentations include: 

“Street Art Graphics” Digital Archive and “People’s History Archive”

This illustrated slide presentation provides an overview of two digital projects related to street-based stickers, posters, and ephemera from around the world. In 2015, as part of a four-year funded initiative, the Council of Independent Colleges selected St. Lawrence University’s “Street Art Graphics” digital archive (http://www.stlawu.edu/gallery/digitalcollections/streetartgraphics.php) as one of 47 projects across the country to be included in Artstor’s Shared Shelf Commons, a free, open access library of digital images and a Web-based service for cataloging and managing digital collections (http://www.sscommons.org/openlibrary/welcome.html). Items in the archive offer social and political commentary and critique on issues ranging from national/global economic crises, environmental degradation, racism, and sexism to surveillance and police brutality. The more recent Drupal-based “People’s History Archive” (http://peopleshistoryarchive.org/), currently under construction, grew out of a five-year Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Humanities grant to St. Lawrence University entitled “Crossing Boundaries: Re-envisioning the Humanities in the 21st Century.” The goal of the project is to document the creative and complex ways people make use of public space. Contributors include undergraduate students, young alumni, and faculty who create mini-online interpretive exhibits using items from the “Street Art Graphics” digital archive and/or items contributors have selected themselves from off-campus research projects.


Working Together to Promote Digitization, Access, and Education

Over the last 10 years, The Constitutional Sources Project (www.ConSource.org) has connected thousands of American citizens of all ages to our nation’s constitutional history by creating a comprehensive, easily searchable, and freely accessible digital library of historical sources related to the creation, ratification, and amendment of the United States Constitution. Our team not only curates important digital collections of historical materials, but also travels the country, working with judges, lawyers, law students, educators and the general public to ensure that the full story of our constitutional form of government is told. ConSource has worked with brick-and-mortar archives, libraries, digital projects and many others to digitize and curate content related to the creation, ratification, and amendment of the United States Constitution. Several of our current working projects, including digital collections on colonial charters and early state constitutions, and women and the constitution, will digitize and make freely available in digital form materials that have never before been digitized or curated into one comprehensive collection. ConSource has developed a successful digital partnership model that has been refined over time. 

Providing Access to Audiovisual Cultural Heritage through the American Archive of Public Broadcasting

The American Archive of Public Broadcasting is an unprecedented initiative to preserve and make accessible significant historical content created by public media. Led by WGBH and The Library of Congress, the AAPB currently preserves 40,000 hours of digital content from nearly 100 stations across the U.S. Nearly 10,000 of these digitized programs have been made available in the AAPB Online Reading Room. The collection contains thousands of high quality regional and local programs documenting American communities during the last half of the twentieth century and the first decade of the twenty-first. This extraordinary collection includes local news and public affairs programs, local history productions that document the heritage of local communities, and programs dealing with education, environmental issues, music, art, literature, dance, poetry, religion, and even filmmaking on a local level. 


Speakers
avatar for Karen Cariani

Karen Cariani

Director, WGBH Educational Foundation
WGBH
AG

Alan Gevinson

Special Assistant to the Chief, National Audio- Visual Conservation Center
JS

Julie Silverbrook

Executive Director, The Constitutional Sources Project (ConSource)
avatar for Catherine Tedford

Catherine Tedford

Director, Richard F. Brush Art Gallery, St. Lawrence University



Friday April 15, 2016 9:30am - 10:15am
National Archives and Records Administration: McGowan Theater Constitution Avenue between 7th and 9th Streets, NW, Washington, DC

9:30am

Digitization in Three Strokes: Digital Commonwealth, Minnesota Digital Library, and The Portal to Texas History

Massachusetts, Minnesota and Texas…Academic and Public…Cowboys, Patriots and Vikings…

Three very different states - all with strong DPLA service hubs. How are they succeeding in their respective environments and what can other prospective service hubs learn from their experiences? This presentation will describe three models, their methods, and lessons learned over the years of conducting digitization programs.


The University of North Texas Libraries (UNT Libraries) has for almost a decade directed a program called Rescuing Texas History Mini-Grant Program (RTH) with the goal of helping local and state-level cultural heritage institutions and private owners digitize their holdings. RTH has allowed UNT Libraries to develop  mutually-beneficial relationships with regional organizations, preserve and provide access to at-risk historical items, and develop a sustainable model for large-scale digitization initiatives.


The Boston Public Library offers statewide digitization services in partnership with Digital Commonwealth. These services were initially funded through LSTA grants but have since been moved onto more stable state funding. As one of the initial service hubs, Digital Commonwealth has built its service plan on a very high-touch, personable, and customizable model for digital project design, imaging, and metadata production. With over 250 partners from 160 municipalities, Digital Commonwealth has developed a strong relationship with the cultural heritage community in Massachusetts which has resulted in a sustainable level of support and positive momentum for future growth.


Founded in 2004 as a collaboration between a number of historical, educational and cultural organizations in the state, the Minnesota Digital Library (MDL) was also one of DPLA’s initial service hubs. Its premier project, Minnesota Reflections, has grown from modest beginnings to encompass over 220,000 digitized items from more than 170 contributors. Now operationally based at the University of Minnesota, MDL is increasing its footprint through new projects while continuing to robustly support its established ones, providing strong digital preservation resources alongside its long-term commitment to help organizations of all sizes around the state increase their digital literacy and make their resources better known.

Speakers
TB

Tom Blake

Digital Projects Manager, Boston Public Library
MH

Molly Huber

Outreach Coordinator, Minnesota Digital Library, Minitex, University of Minnesota
JM

Jake Mangum

Project Development Librarian, University of North Texas Libraries
MM

Marcia McIntosh

Digital Production Librarian, University of North Texas
University of North Texas



Friday April 15, 2016 9:30am - 10:15am
Smithsonian (S. Dillon Ripley Center): Room 3037A 1100 Jefferson Drive, SW Washington, DC

9:30am

Hacking Hemingway: Cracking the Code to the Vault & Virtual Creative Spaces
This session will contain two presentations:

Hacking Hemingway: Cracking the Code to the Vault

“Hacking Hemingway: Cracking the Code to the Vault” is a digital history project funded by the Illinois Secretary of State and Illinois State Library that gives access to rare items from The Ernest Hemingway Foundation of Oak Park and the Oak Park Public Library. By making these digital items available learners can now interact with Hemingway and the places and people that influenced his life and work. A major outcome of the grant is to create opportunities for the learner to become curator. The creation of the Illinois DPLA Hub will allow students from Oak Park and around the world to interact with never before seen Hemingway artifacts. In the presentation we will discuss examples and outcomes of student projects generated from the digital objects to be included in the Illinois Digital Archives and DPLA and the process of collaboration between institutions.


Virtual Creative Spaces

In this session, presenters John Stewart and Harry Costner, veteran teachers and caretakers of Lower Arlington Arts will demonstrate new ways for students to engage text and respond to literature, using examples from their virtual creativity courses, G Create and Teen Writer Society. Participants will engage in several model activities and student "missions" and learn how to establish virtual communities that foster exploration and creativity.


Speakers
avatar for Harry Costner

Harry Costner

Student Voice Amplification, Lower Arlington Arts
Harry Costner is a cofounder of Lower Arlington Arts, a new youth arts collective for media and movement. In addition, he is currently a 20-year public school teacher in the areas of new media production and media literacy. He has given successful workshops at ISTE, SilverDocs (SchoolDocs) and performed at South by Southwest. Harry’s mission is to instill students with creativity, confidence, and independence. His brand of new media skills... Read More →
ER

Emily Reiher

Resident Archivist, Oak Park Public Library
avatar for John Stewart

John Stewart

Caretaker, Lower Arlington Arts
John Stewart is the caretaker of Lower Arlington Arts (http://lowerarlingtonarts.com), a youth arts collective for media and movement, and the Teen Writer Society (http://teenwritersociety.com), for young writers seeking to punk their poetry and to propel their prose. He is a 20-year public school English teacher and big believer in creative adversity. Contact him at lowerarlingtonarts@gmail.com
avatar for Leigh A Tarullo

Leigh A Tarullo

Curator of Special Collections, Oak Park Public Library
Leigh A. Tarullo, M.L.I.S., is the Curator of Special Collections at the Oak Park Public Library and is the Liaison to the Ernest Hemingway Foundation of Oak Park and a DPLA Community Advocate (2014-Present).



Friday April 15, 2016 9:30am - 10:15am
Smithsonian (S. Dillon Ripley Center): Room 3112 1100 Jefferson Drive, SW Washington, DC

9:30am

Historypin and the National Archives: APIs, Apps, and Audiences
Almost two years ago, NARA and Historypin launched a project to digitize WWI content and increase the creative reuse and impact of these collections. Based on the information we’ve gathered, NARA is launching an app to deliver WWI content to museums, teachers, and coders. Come learn about the process we followed and the app we’ve built!

Speakers
CK

Criss Kovac

Motion Picture Preservation Branch Chief, National Archives
MM

Markus Most

Director of Digitization, National Archives
KY

Kerri Young

Historypin



Friday April 15, 2016 9:30am - 10:15am
National Archives and Records Administration: Jefferson Room Constitution Avenue between 7th and 9th Streets, NW, Washington, DC

9:30am

Is there something in the water? Community engagement and OS development EU vs US

Is there something in the water? This presentation will share first-hand research results an ongoing investigation into the memory institution developer community in Europeana compared to the developer communities in the U.S.. Funding streams, cultural differences, absent high level standardization and differing public perceptions of heritage institutions all come into play here. Regretfully, a less collaborative and sustainable developer community in Europe stifles innovation, stretches already thin funding, and fails to catalyze the necessary standardizations and synergies that allow for smaller institutions to be on the same level as their bigger counterparts. Inspired by legacy FOSS initiatives like Apache, the inbox clogging Code4Lib list as well as newer groups like IIIF and Hydra, EuropeanaTech wants to better understand the developer ecosystem in the U.S.A. and explore how it can be cultured within Europeana and the EU.


Speakers
GM

Gregory Markus

EuropeanaTech Community Manager, Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision



Friday April 15, 2016 9:30am - 10:15am
Smithsonian (S. Dillon Ripley Center): Room 3037B 1100 Jefferson Drive, SW Washington, DC

9:30am

Testing a Linked Data Fragments Server using DPLA Data & PCDM, IIIF, and Interoperability
This session will contain two presentations:

Testing a Linked Data Fragments Server using DPLA Data

Based on Ruben Verborgh Linked Data Fragments server, this session is about the latest experiments on implementing a Linked Data Fragments server as an alternative to fully supported SPARQL endpoint. This semantic web system research uses Redis as the backend datastore cache with a server prototype in Python and an initial production server being developed in the Go language. This talk will illustrate the general approach, first demonstrated in Jeremy Nelson's Pycon Japan talk in October 2015 (http://intro2libsys.info/pycon-jp-2015/) , of incrementally improving and testing a linked data fragments server that provides RDF triples in JSON when queried by web clients. This talk will show how DPLA's JSON data is transformed into raw Redis protocol for extremely fast importing of data at scale into a Redis cluster. The talk will then show how by leveraging the flexibility, speed, and caching functionality of DPLA RDF data, Redis enables a linked data fragments caching and distributed server topology that scales while offering faster and more stable retrieval of RDF triples from a sample of DPLA's RDF data. This talk finishes by comparing the performance of a new Go language-based production server versus the Python prototype and future plans for this promising technology.

PCDM, IIIF, and Interoperability

The Portland Common Data Model (PCDM) provides a flexible vocabulary for describing repository content, and aims to allow tools and applications to work with data that have varying metadata standards and levels of complexity. The International Image Interoperability Framework (IIIF) provides standard APIs for describing and delivering images, allowing implementers to develop feature-rich applications while still working with the technology of their choice, and enabling users to integrate content from multiple repositories into a single viewer. Beyond their focus on interoperability, these projects also share a pragmatic approach centered on use cases and community engagement. This talk will describe PCDM and IIIF, and draw lessons about how building community and staying grounded in real world use cases help create standards and tools that work. 


Speakers
avatar for Esmé Cowles

Esmé Cowles

Developer, Princeton University Library
Working on Hydra and Fedora 4 for Princeton. Interested in linked data (and interoperability more broadly), and building communities around PCDM, IIIF, and HydraWorks.
avatar for Jeremy Nelson

Jeremy Nelson

Metadata and Systems Librarian, Colorado College
Jeremy Nelson is the Metadata and Systems Librarian at Colorado College, a four-year private liberal arts college in Colorado Springs. In addition to working 8 hours a week on the library's research help desk, providing information literacy instruction to undergraduates, and supervising the library's systems and cataloging departments, Nelson is the CTO of Knowledgelinks.io and is actively researching and developing various components and... Read More →



Friday April 15, 2016 9:30am - 10:15am
National Archives and Records Administration: Room G-25 700 Pennsylvania Ave NW Washington, DC 20408

9:30am

The People’s Archives: Communities and Documentation Strategy

Some of the most valuable collections documenting the lives of marginalized people in the United States reside in spaces outside traditional academic and government institutions. They exist throughout the country as independently curated, highly valuable sites for remembering, and owned by the communities they document. Recent research in archival studies notes growth in community-based archives. These archives are independent, grassroots alternatives to mainstream repositories through which communities make collective decisions about what is of enduring value to them, shape collective memory of their own pasts, and control the means through which stories about their past are constructed. Such organizations are often created in response to minoritized communities being shut out of dominant historical narratives created by mainstream memory institutions.


This session will examine the impact of community-based archives from two different perspectives.


1. Building a Model for National Collaboration: A People’s Archive of Police Violence in Cleveland


In 2015, the Society of American Archivists (SAA) annual conference was held in Cleveland, a city reeling from several high-profile incidents of police violence against African-American residents. A group of archivists attending SAA responded to this by developing an unofficial conference service project to document incidents of police violence in Cleveland’s neighborhoods. The archivists partnered with a group of local activists to build a website for the digital archive (archivingpoliceviolence.org), collect oral histories in Cleveland neighborhoods, and create a model for ongoing support of the project, consisting of a national advisory board composed of professional archivists, and a local community archivist group composed of Cleveland activists and residents.


This presentation will come from the perspective of the community archivists, who will discuss their experiences in developing the archive in partnership with SAA members, the impact of the archive on the community, and future directions for the project.


2. Assessing the Impact of Community Archives


Since the late 1970s, feminist media scholars have used the term “symbolic annihilation” to denote how strong women characters are absent, grossly under-represented, maligned, or trivialized by mainstream television programming, news outlets, and magazine coverage. In the wake of this absence, minoritized communities fail to see themselves or their place in the world. In archival studies, the concept of symbolic annihilation has recently has been used to describe the affective impact on the South Asian American community of being excluded, silenced or misrepresented in mainstream archival collections and the ways in which an independent community archive, the South Asian American Digital Archive (http://www.saada.org) has had an ontological, epistemological, and social impact on the community it serves. The proposed presentation builds on and expands this research by examining the affective impact of both exclusion and representation in archives on members of communities that have coalesced around and been marginalized because of ethnic, racial, gender, sexual, and/or political identities. Based on more than a dozen in-depth qualitative interviews with practitioners at several independent community archives in Southern California—including those representing LGBTQ communities and people of color—this presentation will address how symbolic annihilation operates and the affect it produces among archives users. I argue that independent, identity-based community archives can counter the symbolic annihilation of mainstream collections by providing avenues for minoritized communities to meaningfully represent themselves. I propose the term representational belonging to describe the ways in which such organizations enable people to have the power and authority to establish and enact their presence in ways that are complex, meaningful, substantive, and positive.

Speakers
MC

Michelle Caswell

Assistant Professor of Archival Studies, UCLA
Co-Founder, South Asian American Digital Archive
BC

Bishop Chui

Community Archivist, People’s Archive of Police Violence
MH

Melissa Hubbard

Head of Special Collections & Archives, Case Western Reserve University
BJ

Bergis Jules

University and Political Papers Archivist, University of California-Riverside
CS

Carol Steiner

Community Archivist, People’s Archive of Police Violence
KW

Keith Wilson

Community Archivist, People’s Archive of Police Violence


Friday April 15, 2016 9:30am - 10:15am
Smithsonian (S. Dillon Ripley Center): Room 3035 1100 Jefferson Drive, SW Washington, DC

9:30am

Digital Newspapers: DPLA Planning and Hub Activities

This session will provide an update on the DPLA Knight Foundation Planning Grant to learn more about the state of newspaper projects in the United States. We will also hear from states who have large newspaper digitization projects about some of their successes and challenges.

North Carolina

With over 400,000 pages and growing, the North Carolina Digital Heritage Center’s newspaper collection is the largest of its kind in the state. Despite this work, the Center could be buried under an onslaught of requests for more; in a recent survey, community newspapers are the second highest digitization priority for cultural heritage institutions in North Carolina. This presentation will discuss how the Center manages its distributed selection model, a recent content management system migration, and the ongoing challenges in meeting demand.

Georgia

The University of Georgia, home of the Digital Library of Georgia, has a long history of preserving and providing access to the state's newspaper heritage. Since 1953, the Georgia Newspaper Project has microfilmed more than 2500 titles, and it continues to film over 200 current newspapers on an ongoing basis. In 2007, the DLG debuted its first archive of digitized newspapers, and it now provides full-text access to over 700,000 newspaper pages. This presentation will discuss the demand for newspapers among our users, our selection criteria, our in-house digitization process, and future plans for expanding the collection.


Speakers
avatar for Emily Gore

Emily Gore

Director for Content, Digital Public Library of America
Emily Gore is the Director for Content of the Digital Public Library of America. In this role, Emily provides strategic vision for DPLA content and metadata, coordinates content and collections workflows and oversees the DPLA Hubs program. Much of Gore’s current daily work focuses on identifying and helping to establish new Service Hubs for DPLA.  Before joining DPLA, Emily served as Associate Dean for Digital... Read More →
avatar for Lisa Gregory

Lisa Gregory

Digital Projects Librarian, North Carolina Digital Heritage Center
avatar for Sheila McAlister

Sheila McAlister

Director, Digital Library of Georgia



Friday April 15, 2016 9:30am - 11:00am
National Archives and Records Administration: Washington Room Constitution Avenue between 7th and 9th Streets, NW, Washington, DC

9:30am

FADGI for Still Imaging: Standards-Compliant Digitization for your Institution

What makes an image a "good" image? How can image quality be measured in a standards-compliant, repeatable fashion? Digitization is expensive; how can we make sure it is being performed correctly?   Don Williams, Advisory Board Member for the FADGI Still Image Working Group, will provide an overview of the Federal Agency Digitization Guidelines Initiative (FADGI) for Still Imaging and the theory behind the metrics used to measure the quality of images created during cultural heritage digitization activities.

Peter Siegel of Digital Transitions Division of Cultural Heritage will demonstrate and discuss imaging solutions for producing Digital Preservation Objects (DPO) with very high FADGI and Metamorfoze scores. Golden Thread FADGI / Metamorfoze compliant targets and DICE analysis software used during cultural heritage imaging activities will be shown including a live demonstration of the analysis of device-level target with and without real objects.

Finally, Jim Studnicki of Creekside Digital will illustrate practical applications of the FADGI guidelines in still imaging projects for cultural heritage institutions, as well as FADGI's impact on project management in digitization efforts. Real-world examples of "preservation-class" (FADGI 3-Star and higher) cultural heritage imaging projects will be discussed and a few "tips and tricks" to achieve FADGI compliance will even be revealed!


Speakers
DP

Doug Peterson

Product Manager, Digital Transitions
JS

Jim Studnicki

President, Creekside Digital
Jim Studnicki is the founder and President of Creekside Digital. Since its founding in 2006, Creekside Digital has focused on providing top-quality, standards-compliant digitization of microfilm, books, newspapers, photographs, artwork, and objects using the most advanced technology available, as well as the development of related software applications for cultural heritage institutions. Prior to founding Creekside Digital, Jim worked in the... Read More →
DW

Don Williams

President, Image Science Associates



Friday April 15, 2016 9:30am - 11:00am
National Archives and Records Administration: Adams Room Constitution Avenue between 7th and 9th Streets, NW, Washington, DC

9:30am

Introduction to Omeka S, Institutional Repositories, and DPLA

The next generation of Omeka, Omeka S, has an explicit goal of increasing data exchange between Omeka S and other repositories holding cultural heritage data, especially institutional repository software like Fedora and DSpace. Integrating with DPLA -- especially facilitating the transfer of data in an Omeka S installation to DPLA -- is therefore a priority for the project. To further facilitate that transfer, Omeka S’s basic resource description template to be compliant with DPLA MAP 4.0.


This workshop will introduce Omeka S, currently in alpha releases, to participants. First we will give a general overview of Omeka S with emphasis on how it intends to connect with institutional repositories. We will then move to how to use its features to prepare data in Omeka S for contributing up through the hubs to DPLA.

Speakers
KA

Ken Albers

Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media
JF

John Flatness

Senior Software Developer, Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media
avatar for Patrick Murray-John

Patrick Murray-John

Research Assistant Professor and Director of Omeka Dev Outreach, Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media
Talk to me about Omeka, especially code and development. LODLAM, Drupal, and tasty beers are also good convos. I'm a developer and research assistant professor at Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media at George Mason University.
JS

Jim Safley

Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media



Friday April 15, 2016 9:30am - 11:00am
National Archives and Records Administration: Madison Room Constitution Avenue between 7th and 9th Streets, NW, Washington, DC

9:30am

DPLA Hands-on Cultural Heritage Hackathon
Links to notes, resources, and schedule: http://bit.ly/dplafest2016-hackathon

This hackathon session is intended for informal collaboration, with a very brief introductory information about the DPLA API and logistics related to the hackathon. For an in-depth introduction to DPLA's API, as well as those for other cultural heritage data sources, please join the hackathon session on Wednesday afternoon.

Speakers
avatar for Audrey Altman

Audrey Altman

Developer, Digital Public Library of America
Audrey Altman is a Developer for DPLA.  She works with the DPLA Technology Team to design, develop, test, integrate, support, and document user-facing applications and back-end systems; support content management policies, process, and workflows, and contribute to the development of new ones; and collaborate with stakeholders to contribute to strategic and tactical planning and implementation of content stewardship applications and... Read More →
MB

Mark Breedlove

Senior Developer, Digital Public Library of America
avatar for Mark Matienzo

Mark Matienzo

Director of Technology, Digital Public Library of America
Mark A. Matienzo is the Director of Technology for DPLA. As Director of Technology, Mark is responsible for the overall technology vision for the DPLA and overseeing its implementation. Mark also serves as the primary technical contact for outside organizations, partners, and developers. Prior to joining DPLA, Mark worked as an archivist and technologist specializing in born-digital materials and metadata management, at institutions including the... Read More →
avatar for Scott Williams

Scott Williams

Developer, DPLA



Friday April 15, 2016 9:30am - 2:00pm
National Archives and Records Administration: Innovation Hub 700 Pennsylvania Ave NW Washington, DC 20408

9:30am

Demo Space

Interact with project representatives and demo cool tools at the demo space. The demo space will be open all day. Participants include:

Digital Transitions Division of Cultural Heritage
DTDCH designs and manufactures its own camera bodies, lens panels, reprographic copystands, and accessories in the United States. Our diverse expertise in the areas of optical, mechanical, and software design provide us a virtually unlimited capacity to custom design solutions to meet specific needs. To find out more about DTDCH, visit http://dtdch.com/.

ReadersFirst
ReadersFirst is an organization of nearly 300 libraries representing 200 million readers dedicated to ensuring access to free and easy-to-use eBook content. To find out more about Readersfirst, visit http://www.readersfirst.org/.

Funders’ Information Table
Pick up literature, learn about current initiatives, and ask questions about opportunities available through a variety of funders, including the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Institute of Museum and Library Services, the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NARA), the Council on Library and Information Resources, and the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

Texthelp
Texthelp believes that everyone shares a fundamental need to be understood by others, and language is our passport to academic, social and professional success. This is what drives Texthelp to create smart, easy-to-use support technologies that enable citizens to read-and-write with confidence and develop digital skills in multiple languages.

SNAC (Social Networks and Archival Context) 
SNAC is addressing a longstanding research challenge: discovering, locating, and using distributed historical records. Scholars use these records as primary evidence for understanding the lives and work of historical persons and the events in which they participated. These records are held in archives and manuscript libraries, large and small, around the world. Scholars may need to search scores of different archives one by one, following clues, hunches, and leads to find the records relevant to their topic. Furthermore, descriptive practices may differ from one archive or library to another. The research is time consuming and inefficient: clues and leads may be easily overlooked and important resources undiscovered. The data needed to address this research challenge already exists in the guides, catalogs, and finding aids that archivists and librarians create to document and provide access to the archival resources. It is buried in isolated guides and finding aids that are stored in different, isolated systems. 


Friday April 15, 2016 9:30am - 4:00pm
National Archives and Records Administration: McGowan Theater Lobbies Constitution Avenue between 7th and 9th Streets, NW, Washington, DC

10:15am

Break
Friday April 15, 2016 10:15am - 10:45am
TBA

10:45am

Digital Collections Showcase #2
Learn about interesting digital collections and projects in this session featuring a handful of 15-minute presentations. Presentations include: 


Documenting Music Subcultures through Oral History

Oral history is a powerful tool for collecting and providing access to the stories of individuals and groups not traditionally included in the historical record. In this panel, Simmons MLIS graduate students will present on the process and considerations behind three unique oral history projects documenting music subculture groups: Open Signal, a Providence, RI artists collective concerned with the state of gender and race in experimental, electronic-based sound and art practices; the Phunky Bitches, a women's service and outreach organization for fans of the band Phish; and, the Otis Mountain Get Down, an annual music festival in the Adirondacks that encourages new and meaningful interactions with art, music, outdoors, and the local community. Presenters will share portions of their projects, and discuss various aspects of the oral history process, including technical components such as digital recording, editing, and archiving, and broader ethical and social considerations like privacy concerns, cultural sensitivity, and copyright.


If a PDF Falls in the Forest Will Anyone See It? Building a Library Ecosystem for Digital Materials

Libraries are spending enormous amounts of money, effort, and staff time to convert their holdings into publicly accessible digital assets. Often the value of these discrete digitized objects can be difficult to appreciate, however, without some supporting intellectual context and infrastructure, especially for a public audience. Context can be a crucial factor for many government documents since they are often perceived as arcane and dull artifacts of the past. The National Agricultural Library has over 30 thousand digitized documents that can be accessed by the public. But making digital materials accessible is not the same as making them meaningful. The library is working to make our digital holdings meaningful and engaging by creating an ecosystem where they can be understood and appreciated. This system aims to bring materials to life by showcasing them in contexts that are both visual and experiential. The three main components of our ecosystem are the general collection, digital exhibits, and a digital magazine. This presentation will demonstrate the vision for this system and these components and how they can work together to engage users.


Speakers
avatar for Leanne Galletly

Leanne Galletly

Simmons College
avatar for Emily Marsh

Emily Marsh

Librarian, National Agricultural Library, USDA
Omeka
BR

Bryce Roe

Simmons College
avatar for Lily Troia

Lily Troia

Digital Services Librarian, College of William & Mary
Lily recently joined the College of William and Mary as their Digital Services Librarian, primarily working at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science in open access and research data management. This position follows her completion of a Masters in Library and Information Science (MSLIS '16) at Simmons College School of Library and Information Science in Boston where she focused on cultural heritage, archives, and digital stewardship with a... Read More →



Friday April 15, 2016 10:45am - 11:30am
National Archives and Records Administration: McGowan Theater Constitution Avenue between 7th and 9th Streets, NW, Washington, DC

10:45am

Desegregating collections: Paths to collaborative projects through the DPLA

The DPLA offers unprecedented opportunities for archives and special collections around the country to reach teachers, students, scholars and the general public. In “Using Large Digital Collections in Education: Meeting the Needs of Teachers and Students” (Digital Public Library of America, April 2015), Franky Abbott and Dan Cohen report that “DPLA’s value for education was two-fold: first as a one place to discover material from many collections, and second, because of this diversity, as a site with content to support local and underrepresented stories that students have not seen before.”


This presentation will report on two ongoing projects funded by the Boston Library Consortium (BLC) that encourage DPLA participation by member institutions and allow members to collaboratively digitize material on topics of hyper-local importance. The first project is a coalition of archives digitizing material to support the Boston Public School system’s new curriculum on school desegregation in the 1960s and 1970s. The goal is to form a robust research collection with materials from multiple institutions that will allow advanced students to delve deeply into the desegregation efforts of Boston’s African-American community and the after effects of Boston’s “busing” crisis. The other is a collaborative technical assistance project to support BLC members’ contributing digitized archival material to DPLA, in spite of wildly different infrastructure and internal practices and policies. In addition to describing the genesis, workflow and outcomes of each of these projects, the panelists will offer notes on their respective institutions’ hopes and plans for partnering with DPLA in sharing digital collections and developing curricular materials that serve their campuses and the wider community. After laying out these sample activities, the floor will be opened for what we hope will be a lively discussion of others’ experiences and wish lists related to DPLA’s potential role in education.


Speakers
avatar for Giordana Mecagni

Giordana Mecagni

Head, Special Collections and University Archivist, Northeastern University Libraries
Archivist, activist, gardener, DIY-er, mama, and I play the underwood 5 in www.bostontypewriterorchestra.com
avatar for Joanne Riley

Joanne Riley

University Archivist, University of Massachusetts, Boston
I happily serve as University Archivist and Curator of Special Collections at UMass Boston, a great urban public university that sits on the edge of Boston Harbor. I manage the Healey Library's archival research collections and related academic and community-based initiatives including overseeing projects like the “Mass. Memories Road Show”, a long-term initiative to collect and archive images and oral histories related to Massachusetts... Read More →
avatar for Jessica Sedgwick

Jessica Sedgwick

Metadata Project Manager, Boston Library Consortium



Friday April 15, 2016 10:45am - 11:30am
Smithsonian (S. Dillon Ripley Center): Room 3035 1100 Jefferson Drive, SW Washington, DC

10:45am

Developing a Digitization Curriculum for New Partners: Combining Best Practices from Four Service Hubs

Developing and maintaining suitable curriculum for all aspects of digitization is a challenge for all DPLA Service Hubs. Thanks to the Public Library Partnerships Project (PLPP), a solid digitization curriculum is now available for all Hubs to use when training new partners. With guidance from Franky Abbott of the DPLA staff, program manager for the project, and funds from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, four DPLA Service Hubs recruited public librarians and supported them through full-day training, selection of materials, digitization, and metadata assignment for their first digital collection, along with creation of thematic regional and national exhibitions. Participating staff came from Digital Commonwealth (MA), Minnesota Digital Library, Digital Library of Georgia, and the Mountain West Digital Library participated, along with staff at the Montana Memory Project, a major regional repository in MWDL.


The curriculum modules, available at http://dp.la/info/about/projects/public-library-partnerships/, cover six phases of digitization:


--Planning for Digitization

--Selecting Content for a Digitization Project

--Understanding Copyright

--Using Metadata to Describe Digital Content

--Digital Reformatting and File Management

--Promoting Use of Your Digital Content


The presenters will discuss the iterative, feedback-based process of curriculum development. During the course of the project, the in-person curriculum was refined to address challenging concepts. For the creation of the self-guided online modules, different approaches and practices at the four Hubs were harmonized, and they worked together to create strong coverage of the entire digitization workflow. They will also discuss the lessons learned in working with more than 45 new public library partners and reflect on how the curriculum modules are being used for training a variety of types of cultural heritage professionals in the DPLA hubs network.

Speakers
avatar for Franky Abbott

Franky Abbott

Franky Abbott works as the Curation and Education Strategist for the Digital Public Library of America. In this capacity, she leads DPLA education initiatives with teachers, and students in K-12 and higher education, organizes the Community Reps program, runs the Gates-funded Public Library Partnerships Project, and collaborates on digital exhibition curation. Franky came to DPLA on an American Council of Learned Societies Public Fellowship in... Read More →
avatar for Sheila McAlister

Sheila McAlister

Director, Digital Library of Georgia
avatar for Sandra McIntyre

Sandra McIntyre

Director of Services and Operations, HathiTrust
Since May 2016 I have been the director of services and operations for HathiTrust at the University of Michigan office in Ann Arbor. HathiTrust is a partnership of over 120 academic and research institutions, offering a collection of millions of titles digitized from libraries around the world. Our TRAC-certified digital preservation repository provides long-term preservation and access services for public domain and in-copyright content from... Read More →



Friday April 15, 2016 10:45am - 11:30am
Smithsonian (S. Dillon Ripley Center): Room 3037A 1100 Jefferson Drive, SW Washington, DC

10:45am

Engaging students and highlighting DPLA collections through Wikipedia

In January 2016, two students at Washington University in St. Louis began participating in an internship program through Wikipedia, using collections in the DPLA Missouri Hub as a basis for their research and writing. During the semester long course developed by Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Education_Program:The_Wikipedia_Library/Library_Interns_(Spring_2016)), students will become familiar with Wikipedia editing practices, add references and citations based on original research using Missouri Hub collections, and draft articles on subjects covered in these collections. As well as helping students to develop marketable writing and research skills, the course will provide another outreach tool for Missouri Hub collections and widen the reach of these important materials. The course is also another collaborative outlet for Missouri Hub partners. To ensure the involvement of partner institutions, Missouri Hub organizations were asked to suggest collections that interns could highlight or that could be better documented on Wikipedia.


Shannon Davis, Digital Library Services Manager, who is supervising the interns during the spring 2016 semester, will present on the structure of the course, what students are expected to learn during the internship, and the impact on Missouri Hub collections and participating institutions. Institutional members of the DPLA Missouri Hub include: Washington University in St. Louis, University of Missouri – St. Louis, St. Louis University, Missouri State Library, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, Missouri History Museum, University of Missouri – Kansas City, Kansas City Public Library, St. Louis Public Library, State Historical Society of Missouri, and Linda Hall Library.

Speakers
avatar for Shannon Davis

Shannon Davis

Digital Library Services Manager, Washington University in St. Louis



Friday April 15, 2016 10:45am - 11:30am
Smithsonian (S. Dillon Ripley Center): Room 3112 1100 Jefferson Drive, SW Washington, DC

10:45am

Go Far, Go Together: A Hydra-Based Aggregator For the Pennsylvania Service Hub

As the newly-formed Pennsylvania Digital Collections Project (PDCP) was preparing to become a DPLA Service Hub for the state of Pennsylvania, we developed a Hydra-based aggregator to begin ingesting digital content. We then went on to deploy it in production and release the code in open source on GitHub.


In this session, we will describe the technical implementation of this aggregator, as well as the role it played as a tool for data review, normalization and remediation both for the contributing institutions and the implementation team. Furthermore we will describe how this aggregator significantly increased buy-in among all project participants, by making the project more tangible and attainable. It also greatly facilitated communication with multiple stakeholders and helped with outreach. The aggregator’s features include DPLA-friendly metadata enhancement, OAI-PMH support, an alternative ingest workflow for repositories without OAI-PMH support, an easy to use interface for metadata harvesting, detailed ingest logs, a web preview interface, and much more!

Speakers
avatar for Delphine Khanna

Delphine Khanna

Head, Digital Library Initiatives, Temple University
KL

Katherine Lynch

University of Pennsylvania Libraries
avatar for Chad Nelson

Chad Nelson

Senior Digital Library Applications Developer, Temple University Libraries



Friday April 15, 2016 10:45am - 11:30am
National Archives and Records Administration: Jefferson Room Constitution Avenue between 7th and 9th Streets, NW, Washington, DC

10:45am

Everything you ever wanted to know about IIIF but were too afraid to ask

This workshop will aim to introduce the International Image Operability Framework (http://iiif.io), and explain the benefits of supporting this standard, which is being rapidly adopted by cultural organizations worldwide.


This will be followed by a quick review of upcoming IIIF standards, and a section showcasing some concrete examples of how it is being used at several institutions including the Qatar Digital Library, Princeton University, Europeana and the DPLA itself. Finally, we will have an open Q&A session where the panel will be on hand to provide advice on what you would need to do in order to provide IIIF support for your own organization.

Speakers
avatar for Esmé Cowles

Esmé Cowles

Developer, Princeton University Library
Working on Hydra and Fedora 4 for Princeton. Interested in linked data (and interoperability more broadly), and building communities around PCDM, IIIF, and HydraWorks.
AI

Antoine Isaac

R&D Manager, Europeana
avatar for Mark Matienzo

Mark Matienzo

Director of Technology, Digital Public Library of America
Mark A. Matienzo is the Director of Technology for DPLA. As Director of Technology, Mark is responsible for the overall technology vision for the DPLA and overseeing its implementation. Mark also serves as the primary technical contact for outside organizations, partners, and developers. Prior to joining DPLA, Mark worked as an archivist and technologist specializing in born-digital materials and metadata management, at institutions including the... Read More →
avatar for Tristan Roddis

Tristan Roddis

Head of Web Development, Cogapp



Friday April 15, 2016 10:45am - 12:15pm
National Archives and Records Administration: Room G-25 700 Pennsylvania Ave NW Washington, DC 20408

10:45am

Perspectives on Data and Quality

Take a deep dive into metadata and quality control. The session will start off with three perspectives on DPLA and data: Corey Harper of NYU will take a look at the DPLA data set as a whole using statistical analyses to highlight the relationship between data characteristics and usage and analyze patterns in the language of description. Next, Chris Stanton of the Empire State Digital Network will discuss the challenges of data quality control at a DPLA Service Hub, highlighting the strategies and tools currently employed as well as areas for improvement. Finally, Gretchen Gueguen of DPLA will discuss DPLA’s perspective on data quality in aggregation. The session will round out with a group discussion geared towards beginning to articulate a standard of quality for DPLA and its Hub network and to identify needs for best practices and tools to meet those standards.


Speakers
avatar for Gretchen Gueguen

Gretchen Gueguen

Data Services Coordinator, Digital Public Library of America
Gretchen Gueguen is a Data Services Coordinator, working alongside our Director and Assistant Director for Content to bring on new partners, conduct data mapping and ingest, perform quality assurance, and support several other critical projects. Prior to DPLA, Gretchen worked as Digital Archivist at the University of Virginia where she helped establish the first born-digital archives program. Gretchen has also worked at East Carolina University... Read More →
CH

Corey Harper

Metadata Services Librarian, New York University
avatar for Chris Stanton

Chris Stanton

Metadata Specialist, Metropolitan New York Library Council



Friday April 15, 2016 10:45am - 12:15pm
Smithsonian (S. Dillon Ripley Center): Room 3037B 1100 Jefferson Drive, SW Washington, DC

11:30am

Break
Friday April 15, 2016 11:30am - 12:00pm
TBA

12:00pm

Technology shorts
Interested in learning more about a cool app or other bit of technology? Looking to hear an update on an exciting technical project? Check out these super short 5 minute technology shorts! Presentations include:


Collection reporting with the collstool 

As a pure aggregator using REPOX to provide NY state collections data to DPLA, the Empire State Digital Network staff had no real way to report on our collections to our providers. Enter the collstool, a Jekyll site hosted on github that takes an XML dump from REPOX and manipulates it to provide rudimentary reporting on Institutions and collections. I'll talk about the design decisions and tech limitations I encountered putting together the tool.

 

The New Innovation Hub at NARA

Learn about the Innovation Hub, a new project from the National Archives and Records Administration. Hear about our citizen scanning initiative and ways we are using crowd sourcing to improve access to our records. We have some great projects going on: a relationship with Wikipedia, collaborations with Latino Tech, volunteers, and educators, and we want to share what's happening.

 

Building Histories of the National Mall

How did they build that? The Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and Museum's team that built the award-winning digital public history site, Histories of the National Mall, developed a guide that shares details each phase of creating website, (http://mallhistory.org/Guide). Voices of the project team are heard in specific sections they authored, which also demonstrate the range and breadth of the collaboration and cooperation that produced mallhistory.org. For organizations in the early planning stages of a project, this guide offers an open source and replicable example for history and cultural heritage professionals wanting a cost-effective solution for developing and delivering mobile content. The guide offers lessons learned and challenges we faced throughout the project’s development, and we discuss how we measured success for this specific project. "Building Histories of the National Mall" belongs to the long tradition of knowledge sharing at RRCHNM that encourages history and humanities professionals to be active designers and builders of their own digital projects, and for making processes as transparent as possible.

DPLA / Ada Lovelace Day events

Over the past year, fellow community rep Christina Harlowe and I made an attempt to create a distributed coding/building event around using DPLA content appropriate for Ada Lovelace day. (http://dpladalovelace.us). As sometimes happens, it didn't really take off. However, I think it is still an idea with potential, and want to publicize it and see if it has legs as a possibility for retrying in 2016.


EMA: A specification for addressing encoded music on the web

Enhancing Music Notation Addressability was a one-year project that investigates methods for addressing arbitrary portions of encoded music notation on the web. By “addressing” we mean being able to refer to, or cite, a passage of music in order to make a statement about it. This could be considered a virtual equivalent of “circling” some music notation on a printed score. This short presentation will show the technical specification created by the EMA project. The specification aims at defining a scheme for addressing a selection of music notation regardless of its representation. The expression is based on simple units that are commonly represented by music notation systems for common western music notation, such as measure, staff, and beat. The expression is formulated as a URL, which makes it possible to target resources on the web. 

Public digital preservation awareness through the Memory Lab at DC Public Library

As a 2015 National Digital Stewardship Residency project, DC Public Library has created a DIY personal archiving lab and educational program series. This is the first program of its kind in a U.S. public library and will open in February 2016. In the lab, patrons can transfer files from obsolete media; digitize video tapes, audiocassettes, photographs and documents; and learn how to care for the digital files they create. The program series includes classes on archiving social media, digital estate planning, and preservation best practices. This lightning talk will cover my research into public needs and attitudes around personal digital preservation, how the lab and classes were built to meet those, and initial outcomes and challenges and lessons learned in the process. I hope that DPLAfest attendees may be inspired to raise awareness about personal digital archiving through their own institutions. You can read more about the Memory Lab and my work on it at http://dclibrary.org/labs/memorylab and https://jaimemears.wordpress.com/.

Catholic, Crowdfunded, and Collaborative: A Unique Approach to Newspaper Digitization 

Like other newspaper digitization programs, the Catholic Newspapers Program (CNP), initiated by the Catholic Research Resources Alliance (CRRA), aims to provide access to newspapers, in this case to all Catholic newspapers published in North America, both newspapers in the public domain and in copyright. But the CNP takes a very different approach to implement its goal. In a collaboration between Reveal Digital, Digital Divide Data, CRRA, and CRRA’s 44 members and 25 digitizing partners, CNP has developed a cost model and project plan that focuses on five major cost elements including rights clearance, data conversion, hosting and delivery platform, project management and outreach. Unlike most newspaper digitization programs, CNP is not grant-funded, but crowdfunded. According to Peggy Glahn, Reveal Digital’s Program Director, the library crowdfunding model “challenges the traditional approach to scholarly publishing. It requires librarians to think more like active investors and publishers and less like consumers.” This presentation will focus on CNP’s unique funding model that challenges traditional approaches, on its inclusion of public domain and in-copyright newspapers and rights clearance, on CNP’s cost model, and finally on the project plan and collaboration with delivery partners. 


Speakers
avatar for Sheila Brennan

Sheila Brennan

Associate Director of Public Projects, Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media, George Mason University
avatar for Dina Herbert

Dina Herbert

Coordinator of the Innovation Hub, National Archives
avatar for Maryann James-Daley

Maryann James-Daley

Manager, Labs at DC Public Library, DC Public Library
emerging technologies, Web communication/writing, social media, FOOD (making, buying and eating), baking, good reads, feminism
avatar for John Mignault

John Mignault

ESDN Technology Specialist, METRO NY
Something about myself.
JM

Jeff Moyer

Reveal Digital
avatar for Patrick Murray-John

Patrick Murray-John

Research Assistant Professor and Director of Omeka Dev Outreach, Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media
Talk to me about Omeka, especially code and development. LODLAM, Drupal, and tasty beers are also good convos. I'm a developer and research assistant professor at Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media at George Mason University.
LS

Lori Silverstein

Digital Divide Data
avatar for Raffaele Viglianti

Raffaele Viglianti

Research Programmer, Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities, University of Maryland



Friday April 15, 2016 12:00pm - 12:45pm
National Archives and Records Administration: McGowan Theater Constitution Avenue between 7th and 9th Streets, NW, Washington, DC

12:00pm

How much does and should digitization cost?

This panel seeks to answer the deceptively simple question of the cost of digitization. When digitization projects vary by collection type, quality, and format, as well as project scope, institutional capacity, workflows, and long-term goals, it is not always clear how to estimate the cost of a specific project. How can you tell if you are spending too much on digitization? Should you consider strategies to reduce costs or increase efficiency? How do different approaches affect quality and sustainability?


This session brings together three speakers who work directly with these issues. Joyce Chapman will discuss her work on the Digital Library Federation (DLF)’s cost assessment working group, which is developing the Digitization Cost Calculator (beta), a planning tool that provides time and costs estimates for digitization projects. They also drafted best practices and guidelines for the collection of time data for various digitization processes. Jen Palmentiero will explore how collaborations can reduce digitization costs for smaller organizations. For the last 12 years, SENYLRC has supported its members' digitization efforts through their Hudson River Valley Heritage (HRVH) service. Jen will illustrate the wide range of local costs by highlighting a few members' projects and will share information on the costs shared by SENYLRC. Sandra McIntyre will discuss the work of MWDL’s Digital Services Pricing Task Force, which conducted an environmental scan of prices offered by a number of vendors and DPLA Service Hubs and instituted a process for establishing common charges across the digitization centers maintained at MWDL partner institutions. The resulting Digital Services Price List provides predictability for costs for basic digitization, hosting, and metadata services offered to libraries, museums, and archives in the MWDL network.

This session is organized by Digitizing Hidden Special Collections and Archives, a program of the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR).


Speakers
avatar for Joyce Chapman

Joyce Chapman

Assessment Coordinator, Duke University Libraries
avatar for Nikki Ferraiolo

Nikki Ferraiolo

Program Officer for Scholarly Resources, Council on Library and Information Resources
avatar for Sandra McIntyre

Sandra McIntyre

Director of Services and Operations, HathiTrust
Since May 2016 I have been the director of services and operations for HathiTrust at the University of Michigan office in Ann Arbor. HathiTrust is a partnership of over 120 academic and research institutions, offering a collection of millions of titles digitized from libraries around the world. Our TRAC-certified digital preservation repository provides long-term preservation and access services for public domain and in-copyright content from... Read More →
JP

Jennifer Palmentiero

Digital Services Librarian, Southeastern New York Library Resources Council



Friday April 15, 2016 12:00pm - 12:45pm
Smithsonian (S. Dillon Ripley Center): Room 3037A 1100 Jefferson Drive, SW Washington, DC

12:00pm

Digitized Newspapers and Research

Working with large collections of digitized historic newspapers provides a challenge and an opportunity for libraries and researchers. From analyzing articles transcribed through optical character recognition text (OCR) to hierarchical serial metadata, digitized newspapers provide new opportunities for researchers to explore how news traveled, was used and reused, and how it affected the communities it informed. For libraries, newspapers are complex, as serials and as compound objects, filled with poems, ads and articles on a single page. This session would include lessons learned from the National Digital Newspaper Program (NDNP) about digital object standards, interface design, use of APIs and bulk data downloads and feedback from users such as genealogists and digital humanities researchers. The session will also provide information about the Chronicling America Historic Newspapers Data Challenge, a contest sponsored by the National Endowment for the Humanities.  This opportunity challenges members of the public to produce creative web-based projects using the API developed by the Library of Congress to access the data in Chronicling America.


Speakers
RB

Robin Butterhof

Digital Conversion Specialist, Library of Congress
LW

Leah Weinryb Grohsgal

National Endowment for the Humanities
DT

Deborah Thomas

Library of Congress



Friday April 15, 2016 12:00pm - 12:45pm
National Archives and Records Administration: Washington Room Constitution Avenue between 7th and 9th Streets, NW, Washington, DC

12:00pm

DPLA Board Q&A
Join members of the DPLA Board of Directors for an open Q&A session. 

Moderators
avatar for Amy Ryan

Amy Ryan

Amy Ryan is an Advisor in Residence at the Simmons Graduate School of Library and Information Science, a member of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Libraries Visiting Committee, the Beacon Hill Village Council and the Massachusetts Women’s Forum. Ryan has over 35 years of public library management experience. From 2008 to 2015, she was president of Boston Public Library.  Prior to that, Ryan was director of the Hennepin County... Read More →

Friday April 15, 2016 12:00pm - 12:45pm
National Archives and Records Administration: Adams Room Constitution Avenue between 7th and 9th Streets, NW, Washington, DC

12:00pm

Omeka, in the Library, with an Open Collection

Since its initial release in 2008, Omeka has become a widely used tool for web publishing in libraries and cultural heritage organizations. In the intervening years, the product suite has grown from the single-site “Classic” version of Omeka, to include a hosted solution, Omeka.net, and now a new version, Omeka S, that is designed to meet the needs of medium to larger libraries and cultural heritage organization. This presentation will provide an overview of some of the most innovative and successful implementations of Omeka by cultural heritage institutions through the years and it will point to possible innovative work to come.


Speakers
KA

Ken Albers

Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media
SL

Sharon Leon

Director, Public Projects, Omeka, RRCHNM


Friday April 15, 2016 12:00pm - 12:45pm
National Archives and Records Administration: Madison Room Constitution Avenue between 7th and 9th Streets, NW, Washington, DC

12:00pm

Report on the Primary Source Sets project from DPLA’s Education Advisory Committee

In this session, educators representing DPLA’s Education Advisory Committee and DPLA staff will give share their collaborative Primary Source Sets project. Through the presentation, they will explore the project’s goals and progress, the curation and design processes, lessons learned from use of the sets thus far, and future directions for primary source sets and engagement with educators. The session will include specific feedback about how educators have implemented the sets in the classroom at various levels as well as an explanation of the marketing strategy in place to grow their audience. At the end of the session, presenters will take questions from participants about the project.


Speakers
avatar for Franky Abbott

Franky Abbott

Franky Abbott works as the Curation and Education Strategist for the Digital Public Library of America. In this capacity, she leads DPLA education initiatives with teachers, and students in K-12 and higher education, organizes the Community Reps program, runs the Gates-funded Public Library Partnerships Project, and collaborates on digital exhibition curation. Franky came to DPLA on an American Council of Learned Societies Public Fellowship in... Read More →
avatar for Audrey Altman

Audrey Altman

Developer, Digital Public Library of America
Audrey Altman is a Developer for DPLA.  She works with the DPLA Technology Team to design, develop, test, integrate, support, and document user-facing applications and back-end systems; support content management policies, process, and workflows, and contribute to the development of new ones; and collaborate with stakeholders to contribute to strategic and tactical planning and implementation of content stewardship applications and... Read More →
KD

Kerry Dunne

Boston Public Schools
EH

Ella Howard

Armstrong State University
JL

Jamie Lathan

North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics


Friday April 15, 2016 12:00pm - 12:45pm
National Archives and Records Administration: Jefferson Room Constitution Avenue between 7th and 9th Streets, NW, Washington, DC

12:00pm

The International Framework and the Reality of Copyright Determination: Copyright Developments in the US, the EU and WIPO and Briefing on the Copyright Review Management System (CRMS)

How can engagement in law, policy, and practical work best be utilized for the benefit of DPLA’s projects and expansion? This presentation will provide a focused overview of recent developments in copyright law from both sides of the Atlantic relevant to digitization and access to digital materials (whether online, on library premises, or e-lending). This panel will consider key policy developments coming from the US, the EU and the international arena (WIPO) pointing to a promising momentum for the future of accessibility to digitized works. We will also consider the Copyright Review Management System (CRMS) as a practical path in the context of current law and policy and as a way we can push boundaries of knowledge. As an IMLS-funded cooperative effort, CRMS provided a methodology for identifying the copyright status of books in HathiTrust. Based at the University of Michigan Library, CRMS has worked for the past 8 years to develop a copyright determination framework with 16 partners in the US and Canada resulting in a forthcoming CRMS Toolkit and consideration by HathiTrust about future activity in copyright determination work.


Speakers
KE

Kristina Eden

Copyright Review Project Manager, HathiTrust
I lead a group of copyright reviewers from academic libraries who review the rights of books in HathiTrust. We've identified over 300,000 public domain books and made them available for people to read through DPLA.
avatar for Melissa Levine

Melissa Levine

Lead Copyright Officer, University of Michigan Library
avatar for Argyri Panezi

Argyri Panezi

Ph.D. Candidate (Department of Law), European University Institute



Friday April 15, 2016 12:00pm - 12:45pm
Smithsonian (S. Dillon Ripley Center): Room 3112 1100 Jefferson Drive, SW Washington, DC

12:00pm

Wax Works in the Age of Digital Reproduction: The Futures of Sharing Native/First Nations Cultural Heritage

This presentation discusses the development of digital curatorial workflows for managing, vetting and sharing indigenous community cultural heritage and intellectual property by the open source platforms Local Contexts (www.localcontexts.org) and Mukurtu CMS (www.mukurtu.org), working in collaboration with the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress (www.loc.gov/folklife) and the Passamaquoddy Nation of Maine. Local Contexts (www.localcontexts.org) is a new initiative to support Native, First Nations, Aboriginal, and Indigenous communities in the management of their intellectual property (IP) and cultural heritage specifically within the digital environment. Combining both legal and educational components including the development of the Traditional Knowledge (TK) Labels, Local Contexts has two objectives: One is to promote a new classificatory, curatorial and display paradigm for museums, libraries and archives that hold extensive collections of indigenous people’s cultural heritage by allowing information from and by the community of origin to be expressed in catalog records. The other objective is to enhance and legitimize indigenous decision-making and control over IP, especially in determining and culturally appropriate conditions for sharing historical and contemporary collections of material and digital culture.


In this project, the Passamaquoddy Nation is developing its own unique set of Local Contexts’ TK Labels within the innovative, open-source Mukurtu CMS platform (www.mukurtu.org) so that community members can annotate, narrate and share their content across platforms and institutions. The TK Labels will become part of the metadata for the Library of Congress’s recent preservation digitization recordings of the original wax cylinders of Passamaquoddy people documented by anthropologist Jesse Walter Fewkes in 1890; these are among the earliest known ethnographic field recordings in the world. Audience members are encouraged to participate in a discussion of various components of this initiative to develop new digital tools and methods for managing cultural heritage and intellectual property rights that center and prioritize Native communities cultural protocols for access and circulation.


Speakers
JA

Jane Anderson

Assistant Professor of Anthropology and Museum Studies, New York University
Dr. Jane Anderson is Assistant Professor of Anthropology and Museum Studies at New York University. She has a Ph.D. in Law from the Law School at University of New South Wales in Australia. Her work is focused on the philosophical and practical problems for intellectual property law and the protection of Indigenous/traditional knowledge resources and cultural heritage in support of Indigenous knowledge sovereignty. Her most recent project with... Read More →
avatar for Guha Shankar

Guha Shankar

Folklife Specialist, American Folklife Center, Library of Congress
Guha Shankar is Folklife Specialist at the American Folklife Center, Library of Congress. At the Center, he works with colleagues to develop digital technology solutions to the challenges of sustaining, preserving, and providing access to audio-visual collections, in particular Native American cultural heritage materials. He is also involved in a range of public outreach programs, including multi-media productions and documentation efforts... Read More →
DK

Dr. Kim Christen Withey

Director of the Digital Technology and Culture Program; Director of Digital Projects, Native Programs; co-Director, Center for Digital Scholarship and Curation, Washington State University
Dr. Kim Christen Withey is the Director of the Digital Technology and Culture Program, the Director of Digital Projects, Native Programs, and the co-Director of the Center for Digital Scholarship and Curation at Washington State University. She is the founder of Mukurtu CMS (http://www.mukurtu.org) an open source community digital archive platform designed to meet the needs of Indigenous communities globally, she is also the co-Director of the... Read More →



Friday April 15, 2016 12:00pm - 12:45pm
Smithsonian (S. Dillon Ripley Center): Room 3035 1100 Jefferson Drive, SW Washington, DC

12:45pm

Lunch
Boxed lunches will be available at both the National Archives and the Smithsonian Ripley Center in the following locations:

  • McGowan Theater Lobbies (NARA)
  • Innovation Hub (NARA)
  • Room 3108 concourse (Smithsonian)

Friday April 15, 2016 12:45pm - 2:00pm
TBA

2:00pm

Building Tools with the DPLA API and Developer Showcase
Links to presentations and notes: http://bit.ly/dplafest2016-showcase

Developers who have built something using DPLA’s API will share their work in this fast-paced lightning session (5 minutes per presentation). DPLAfest 2016 hackathon participants will also show off their creations during this session. Presentations include: 

EasyRDF and DPLA LOD (Patrick Murray-John)

 This quick lightning talk will describe a project to use the EasyRDF PHP library for parsing data from DPLA. It's in early stages, and I'd like to hear feedback about how it might be used and what problems it could solve for developers. It also raises a question I'd like to hear responses to: To what extent do developers treat the JSON-LD as just JSON versus as the graph structure of RDF that it serializes.

Mediachain (Denis Nazarov)

Mediachain is an open, shared data network for creative works. It makes cross-institutional collaboration and developer reuse of open cultural data simple. This presentation will discuss how shared blockchain infrastructure can foster innovation and realize the promise of open cultural data.

 

Speakers
avatar for Patrick Murray-John

Patrick Murray-John

Research Assistant Professor and Director of Omeka Dev Outreach, Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media
Talk to me about Omeka, especially code and development. LODLAM, Drupal, and tasty beers are also good convos. I'm a developer and research assistant professor at Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media at George Mason University.
avatar for Denis Nazarov

Denis Nazarov

Engineer, Mine Labs
Denis Nazarov is a software engineer and co-founder of Mine, a startup that is contributing to the open-source development of Mediachain, a blockchain-based registry for creative works. He holds a BFA in Photography from New York University.



Friday April 15, 2016 2:00pm - 2:45pm
National Archives and Records Administration: McGowan Theater Constitution Avenue between 7th and 9th Streets, NW, Washington, DC

2:00pm

Creating compelling user interfaces

Putting your archive online fulfils the basic prerequisite of providing remote access, but the real benefit occurs when online visitors can use it to extract meaning from your content.


In this talk I will explore how modern search and image servers, coupled with the latest browser capabilities, can allow you to create engaging interfaces for your users that are very far from the traditional data-driven approaches. Using examples from a range of projects, I will show how your archival metadata can be transformed from dry formats such as METS, MODS, EAD and ALTO into compelling and innovative interfaces for end-users, ranging from interactive graphs and charts, to arcade games and even 3D virtual reality environments.

Speakers
avatar for Tristan Roddis

Tristan Roddis

Head of Web Development, Cogapp



Friday April 15, 2016 2:00pm - 2:45pm
National Archives and Records Administration: Madison Room Constitution Avenue between 7th and 9th Streets, NW, Washington, DC

2:00pm

Digital Resources in the Wild West: The DPLA and Rural American Libraries

Recent surveys have estimated that approximately 80% of public libraries in the United States are rural and are often the only free internet and wireless access points in their areas. The DPLA offers free access to images, documents, educational tools, and a growing myriad of other digital resources that can benefit rural populations.

Nevada is the 7th largest state in size in the United States but only ranks 35th in population, with most of the population centered in two urban areas located 450 miles apart. Even so, over half of Nevada libraries are rural, and often located in rugged, difficult to access areas. These libraries can connect rural populations that are scattered across 110,000 square miles of wild terrain to our national digital library.

Efforts to bring Nevadans to the DPLA through talks, surveys, and direct correspondence can be used as a model for other DPLA regional representatives to follow when considering how to reach out to their own, unique rural libraries.

This session will offer strategies on how to educate and encourage rural librarians and staff to implement programs that will expose rural communities to the riches offered by the DPLA. Examples of ways to reach out to rural librarians to understand their needs without having to drive for hundreds of miles will also be offered. Finally, specific resources, projects, and apps associated with the DPLA that might most benefit rural populations will be discussed.

Speakers
avatar for Amy J. Hunsaker

Amy J. Hunsaker

Digital Initiatives Librarian, University of Nevada, Reno
Amy J. Hunsaker is a digital librarian who lives in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada mountains. She loves the wildness of the region and its vibrant history, and she enjoys sharing information about Nevada with anyone who is interested.


Friday April 15, 2016 2:00pm - 2:45pm
Smithsonian (S. Dillon Ripley Center): Room 3037B 1100 Jefferson Drive, SW Washington, DC

2:00pm

DPLA's Archival Description Working Group Update

During this session the Archival Description Working Group will give an update of their work to date and a preview of the recommendations that will be in the whitepaper they will release later in the summer. The presentation should offer an opportunity for DPLA community members interested in archival materials and other collection-based materials to engage in discussions of the unique challenges these materials present for aggregation.


Speakers
avatar for Gretchen Gueguen

Gretchen Gueguen

Data Services Coordinator, Digital Public Library of America
Gretchen Gueguen is a Data Services Coordinator, working alongside our Director and Assistant Director for Content to bring on new partners, conduct data mapping and ingest, perform quality assurance, and support several other critical projects. Prior to DPLA, Gretchen worked as Digital Archivist at the University of Virginia where she helped establish the first born-digital archives program. Gretchen has also worked at East Carolina University... Read More →


archival pptx

Friday April 15, 2016 2:00pm - 2:45pm
Smithsonian (S. Dillon Ripley Center): Room 3112 1100 Jefferson Drive, SW Washington, DC

2:00pm

Making Access Happen: The Public Interest Declassification Board and the Case for Technology and Prioritization in Declassification

The Public Interest Declassification Board (“the PIDB”) is an advisory committee established by Congress in 2000, in order to promote the fullest possible public access to a thorough, accurate, and reliable documentary record of significant U.S. national security decisions and activities.

 

Although an independent committee outside of government, the PIDB’s work directly impacts policy development at the highest levels of the executive branch related to transparency and open government. It advises the President and other executive branch officials on policies deriving from Presidential Executive orders regarding the classification and declassification of national security information. The PIDB also advises the President and other executive branch officials on the identification, collection, review for declassification and release of declassified records and materials of archival value. In this regard, the PIDB’s mission directly supports that of the National Archives: to make access happen.

 

The presentation will include remarks from PIDB members and emeritus members on the history of the PIDB and its activities, insights into the PIDB’s recommendations to the President and a discussion of the substantial impact of the recommendations on policy development in the Executive Office of the President. Members will also share information about the current study the PIDB is undertaking concerning technological modernization of the classification and declassification system for long-term sustainability.


Friday April 15, 2016 2:00pm - 2:45pm
National Archives and Records Administration: Adams Room Constitution Avenue between 7th and 9th Streets, NW, Washington, DC

2:00pm

The Preservation Puzzle: Integrating Digital Preservation and the DPLA

Digital preservation is an ongoing concern for almost every aspect of higher education. We are producing digital content at an alarming rate—more than can currently be stewarded. Libraries and IT organizations have to combine their strengths to seek out scalable, enterprise solutions that can handle born digital content—content that is enormous in scope, highly complex, and iterative by nature. The Academic Preservation Trust (aptrust.org) is a partnership that seeks to leverage leaders in the field of digital preservation in order to meet some of these challenges head on. As a strategic collaboration among 17 institutions and growing, we seek to address issues such as data security, trusted digital repository status, content management strategies, and enterprise IT solutions. The APTrust serves as a first node for the Digital Preservation Network and currently uses Amazon Web Services as its back end management solution. We hope to engage participants with fresh user stories of our successes and challenges over the last two years as well as enlist them in mapping out future directions that we can all share. This session will ask its audience to point to local success stories, gaps, and specific strategic growth areas for a wide variety of organizations and sectors both inside and outside higher education.


The Preservation Puzzle will highlight specific challenges that we have encountered with working with a wide variety of partners: Presidents; Provosts; CIOs; Deans; and Librarians. In doing so, we will be soliciting feedback and shared stories from among the audience in order to foster a more transparent approach to digital preservation. Highlighting some of the challenges will help participants recognize the strengths and weaknesses in their own organizations and allow for a conversation as to strategies and tactics that have proven or could prove successful in engaging such a disparate group of digital preservation stewards.


Speakers
BD

Bradley Daigle

University of Virginia Library
avatar for Chip German

Chip German

Program Director, Academic Preservation Trust, University of Virginia
APTrust, University of Virginia Library
MM

Mary Molinaro

Chief Operating Officer and Service Manager, Digital Preservation Network



Friday April 15, 2016 2:00pm - 2:45pm
Smithsonian (S. Dillon Ripley Center): Room 3037A 1100 Jefferson Drive, SW Washington, DC

2:00pm

The Zine Union Catalog and Opportunities with the DPLA Community

Zines are self-published, non-commercial, small-edition, generally periodical resources that often feature sub- or counter-cultural content and design choices. Zines are used as primary sources on social movements, social life, politics, art, music, and more. Currently, access to zines is distributed across a variety of data silos, such as library catalogs, finding aids, independent databases, spreadsheets, and text documents. Much of this data is created and maintained outside of traditional libraries by zine communities themselves, using available tools and ad-hoc standards or practices.


To enable global access to zines, a collaborative team of zine librarians, archivists, library catalogers, metadata specialists, and Web developers is working to build the Zine Union Catalog (ZUC), which will integrate digitized and digital content, bibliographic metadata, contextual resources, and access details in a single discovery platform for zine libraries and collections.


This presentation will first introduce the ZUC project, explaining how the team plans to: 1) aggregate heterogeneous data sources, 2) encourage broad participation in metadata creation with approachable resource description standards, 3) respond to evolving resource genres and research needs through extensible ontology/vocabulary development, and 4) balance the privacy concerns of zine creators with needs for authority control and collocation. In this section, audience members will learn how to effectively describe and build access to zine resources.


The second half of the session will engage audience members to generate ideas for ZUC-DPLA partnerships. Areas of overlap include both practical and philosophical approaches, such as digitization, global access to resources, and open participation. Together, we might re-imagine what it means to build and deliver a union catalog for the digital age.

Speakers
avatar for Jennifer Hecker

Jennifer Hecker

Digital Archives Access Strategist, University of Texas at Austin
I am a manuscript archivist specializing in processing large collections of literary and personal papers including the Norman Mailer Papers, the David Mamet Papers and the Morris L. Ernst Papers, all at the Harry Ransom Center, and the Richard W. Pound Olympic Collection at the University of Texas Libraries. Currently, I use that experience to help inform the development of digital access strategies at UT Libraries. I also direct the work of... Read More →
avatar for Allison Jai O'Dell

Allison Jai O'Dell

Metadata Librarian, University of Florida
Allison works in technical services for special collections and archives. Her research and development projects focus on metadata, Linked Data, and front-end Web development. Details and CV: http://www.allisonjai.com



Friday April 15, 2016 2:00pm - 2:45pm
Smithsonian (S. Dillon Ripley Center): Room 3035 1100 Jefferson Drive, SW Washington, DC

2:00pm

Using the DPLA for Teaching and Learning in Higher Education

This presentation focuses on user interaction with the DPLA in the context of academic use. It reports the findings of a user study conducted with university students and faculty. The purpose of the study was to examine user navigation and the potential of using the DPLA in the context of teaching and learning activities in higher education. Twenty one participants were recruited from a variety of social sciences and humanities programs and included two faculty members, six undergraduates, and 13 graduate students. The study was exploratory in nature and adopted a qualitative research strategy with direct observations and interviews. During observation sessions, the participants were presented with two pre-defined scenarios and were asked to search for images, maps, and sound recordings that they could potentially use in class projects and papers. The participants also had an option of conducting two additional searches on the topics related to their academic interests. The observation sessions were recorded with Camtasia software. Interviews were conducted after observation sessions to record participants’ reactions about the nature of their experience with the DPLA and to explore the potential of using the DPLA for teaching and learning activities.


Most study participants were new users of the DPLA. Four participants heard about the site, but only two had actually used it prior to the study. The majority of participants had a very positive experience searching the DPLA and found the site relevant to their academic needs. Most study participants were able to search the DPLA system effectively and took advantage of the format and subject refinements as well as the map visualization tool. A few students experienced difficulties navigating through the layers to locate digital objects provided by service hubs. The participants were impressed with the amount of aggregated resources and ability to search for a variety of objects from one portal. They liked the fact that resources were not only curated by libraries with readily available citation information, but also publicly available. There were some differences in the ways faculty, graduate students, and undergraduate students would use the DPLA for their academic work. Faculty highlighted the abundance of images and other primary source that they could use in teaching. Graduate students commented on the potential of the DPLA for interdisciplinary research and ability to discover a wide range of digital libraries they were not aware of and would not think about searching. Undergraduate students viewed the DPLA as a good starting point for research and liked the exhibits as means of learning about the topic quickly and finding additional resources.

Speakers
avatar for Krystyna Matusiak

Krystyna Matusiak

Assistant Professor in Library and Information Science Program (LIS), University of Denver
Krystyna K. Matusiak has been working as an Assistant Professor in the Library & Information Science Program (LIS) at the Morgridge College of Education since September 2011. She earned her MLIS and PhD from University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. Prior to accepting her position at the University of Denver, she worked as a Digital Collections Librarian for ten years and was the Head of the Digitization Unit at the University of... Read More →



Friday April 15, 2016 2:00pm - 2:45pm
National Archives and Records Administration: Jefferson Room Constitution Avenue between 7th and 9th Streets, NW, Washington, DC

2:45pm

Break
Friday April 15, 2016 2:45pm - 3:15pm
TBA

3:15pm

Closing remarks
Speakers
avatar for Dan Cohen

Dan Cohen

Executive Director, Digital Public Library of America
Dan Cohen is the Founding Executive Director of the DPLA, where he works to further the DPLA’s mission to make the cultural and scientific heritage of humanity available, free of charge, to all. Prior to his tenure, Dan was a Professor of History and the Director of the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media at George Mason University. At the Center, Dan oversaw projects ranging from new publishing ventures (PressForward) to online... Read More →


Friday April 15, 2016 3:15pm - 4:00pm
National Archives and Records Administration: McGowan Theater Constitution Avenue between 7th and 9th Streets, NW, Washington, DC